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  1. W. Primak, J. Appl. Phys. 35, 1342 (1964).
    [Crossref]
  2. The instrument used in photoelastic studies is conventionally and properly called a polariscope because the polarizer and analyzer are maintained in fixed relationship, either crossed or parallel; and the readings are taken with a compensator inserted between these elements, along with the object. Ambiguity arises when the de Senarmont compensator is used because in this case the ellipticity of the light is resolved with a λ/4 plate and the analyzer is rotated to take readings. Such instruments are sometimes referred to as polarimeters, other times also as polariscopes.
  3. For lack of a better term, this older usage is employed: “… applied in optics to describe the effect of a polarizing medium, as a crystalline plate, in causing the reappearance of a ray, in consequence of a change in its plane of polarization which previously to the change was intercepted by the analyzer …” from Webster’s New International Dictionary (G. and C. Merriam Co., Springfield, Mass., 1937), 2nd ed.
  4. W. Primak, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 13, 279 (1960).
    [Crossref]
  5. O. S. Heavens, Optical Properties of Thin Films (Dover Publications, Inc., New York, 1965), p. 51.
  6. H. Osterberg and L. W. Smith, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 54, 1073, 1078 (1964).
    [Crossref]
  7. D. W. Wilmot and E. R. Schineller, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 56, 839 (1966).
    [Crossref]
  8. W. Primak and J. Luthra, Phys. Rev. 150, 551 (1966).
    [Crossref]

1966 (2)

1964 (2)

1960 (1)

W. Primak, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 13, 279 (1960).
[Crossref]

Heavens, O. S.

O. S. Heavens, Optical Properties of Thin Films (Dover Publications, Inc., New York, 1965), p. 51.

Luthra, J.

W. Primak and J. Luthra, Phys. Rev. 150, 551 (1966).
[Crossref]

Osterberg, H.

Primak, W.

W. Primak and J. Luthra, Phys. Rev. 150, 551 (1966).
[Crossref]

W. Primak, J. Appl. Phys. 35, 1342 (1964).
[Crossref]

W. Primak, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 13, 279 (1960).
[Crossref]

Schineller, E. R.

Smith, L. W.

Wilmot, D. W.

J. Appl. Phys. (1)

W. Primak, J. Appl. Phys. 35, 1342 (1964).
[Crossref]

J. Opt. Soc. Am. (2)

J. Phys. Chem. Solids (1)

W. Primak, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 13, 279 (1960).
[Crossref]

Phys. Rev. (1)

W. Primak and J. Luthra, Phys. Rev. 150, 551 (1966).
[Crossref]

Other (3)

O. S. Heavens, Optical Properties of Thin Films (Dover Publications, Inc., New York, 1965), p. 51.

The instrument used in photoelastic studies is conventionally and properly called a polariscope because the polarizer and analyzer are maintained in fixed relationship, either crossed or parallel; and the readings are taken with a compensator inserted between these elements, along with the object. Ambiguity arises when the de Senarmont compensator is used because in this case the ellipticity of the light is resolved with a λ/4 plate and the analyzer is rotated to take readings. Such instruments are sometimes referred to as polarimeters, other times also as polariscopes.

For lack of a better term, this older usage is employed: “… applied in optics to describe the effect of a polarizing medium, as a crystalline plate, in causing the reappearance of a ray, in consequence of a change in its plane of polarization which previously to the change was intercepted by the analyzer …” from Webster’s New International Dictionary (G. and C. Merriam Co., Springfield, Mass., 1937), 2nd ed.

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Figures (2)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Cross section of an irradiated block of vitreous silica, indicating the rays interfering in the altered layer of refractive index N2 on the block of refractive index N1. The angles and the thickness d are greatly exaggerated; in fact α2<7° and d~1μ. N2 is <0.011 greater than N1. B is the direction of bombardment. The angles which are not mentioned in the text are needed for calculation of the results shown in Fig. 2.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Typical fringe systems calculated for multiple-reflection interference in the layer d (Fig. 1) for incident light polarized at 45° azimuth, viewed with a crossed analyzer; N2N1 = 0.0113, angle f = 1°. Curve A for d = 2 μ; curve B for d = 1 μ. The symbols are those given in Fig. 1.