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  1. A search of the literature has revealed no directly related research, although the relationship between flicker and apparent movement in motion pictures has been discussed by N. R. Chatterjee, Indian J. Psychol. 29, 155 (1954).
  2. M. L. Braunstein, J. Exptl. Psychol (to be published).

1954 (1)

A search of the literature has revealed no directly related research, although the relationship between flicker and apparent movement in motion pictures has been discussed by N. R. Chatterjee, Indian J. Psychol. 29, 155 (1954).

Braunstein, M. L.

M. L. Braunstein, J. Exptl. Psychol (to be published).

Chatterjee, N. R.

A search of the literature has revealed no directly related research, although the relationship between flicker and apparent movement in motion pictures has been discussed by N. R. Chatterjee, Indian J. Psychol. 29, 155 (1954).

Indian J. Psychol. (1)

A search of the literature has revealed no directly related research, although the relationship between flicker and apparent movement in motion pictures has been discussed by N. R. Chatterjee, Indian J. Psychol. 29, 155 (1954).

Other (1)

M. L. Braunstein, J. Exptl. Psychol (to be published).

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Figures (2)

F. 1
F. 1

Positions of the dots on nine successive film frames for each type of display. The illustrated frames represent portions of the projected frames, including approximately 10% of their horizontal extent.

F. 2
F. 2

A graphic representation of the reported perceptions. The number of dots and their approximate spacing, relative to dot diameter, are based on subjects’ responses.