Abstract

When spectral band models are applied to small-frequency intervals within a band, the parameter γ0/d may be derived for these intervals. For the case of an Elsasser band the quantity d is equal to the distance between adjacent lines. Since line positions are known for many molecular bands it is possible to derive d and hence γ0, the line width in each interval. It follows that by this method γ0 is derived from low-resolution transmittance measurements. The method is shown to be accurate within ±20% for the fundamental vibration band of CO and is then applied to the 4.5-μ band of N2O. In part of this band the value of γ0 is found to be 0.08 cm−1atm−1 at 300°K for nitrogen broadened N2O.

© 1966 Optical Society of America

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