Abstract

The paper presents a theoretical development of the optical characteristics of photometers employing lenses. Both in-focus and out-of-focus operation are analyzed in detail for three types of photometers: a photometer employing fixed apertures, a photometer employing a simple lens, and a photometer employing a combination of a simple lens and a fixed aperture. The range of satisfactory operation of such instruments is carefully defined, as well as the gross errors which may occur in special applications.

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References

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  1. P. Moon and D. E. Spencer, "Photometry," Encyclopedia Britannica, (Encyclopedia Britannica Press, New York, 1948), Vol. 17, pp. 480–485.
  2. P. Moon, Scientific Basis of Illuminating Engineering (Dover Press, New York, 1961), p. 334.

Moon, P.

P. Moon and D. E. Spencer, "Photometry," Encyclopedia Britannica, (Encyclopedia Britannica Press, New York, 1948), Vol. 17, pp. 480–485.

P. Moon, Scientific Basis of Illuminating Engineering (Dover Press, New York, 1961), p. 334.

Spencer, D. E.

P. Moon and D. E. Spencer, "Photometry," Encyclopedia Britannica, (Encyclopedia Britannica Press, New York, 1948), Vol. 17, pp. 480–485.

Other

P. Moon and D. E. Spencer, "Photometry," Encyclopedia Britannica, (Encyclopedia Britannica Press, New York, 1948), Vol. 17, pp. 480–485.

P. Moon, Scientific Basis of Illuminating Engineering (Dover Press, New York, 1961), p. 334.

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