Abstract

The addition-of-velocities hypothesis, which Kantor recently claimed to have verified, has been investigated using a different experimental arrangement. A laser beam was passed through a moving mica window, which might be considered as a Huygens-type moving source of light. An interferometer was built with which to detect and measure any change in speed of the emitted light. The apparatus allowed investigation of: the effects of window speed, which could be varied continuously up to 63m/sec; direction of window motion with respect to direction of propagation; and the effects of air in the beam path. Emission theory as used by Kantor predicted a 13 fringe shift; however, no shift was observed under any conditions. The estimated sensitivity of the method is 1/20 fringe. Our results are therefore consistent with the second postulate of special relativity, but not with Kantor’s hypothesis.

© 1965 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. W. Kantor, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 52, 978 (1962).
    [Crossref]
  2. G. Babcock and T. Bergman, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 54, 2 (1964).
    [Crossref]

1964 (1)

G. Babcock and T. Bergman, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 54, 2 (1964).
[Crossref]

1962 (1)

Babcock, G.

G. Babcock and T. Bergman, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 54, 2 (1964).
[Crossref]

Bergman, T.

G. Babcock and T. Bergman, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 54, 2 (1964).
[Crossref]

Kantor, W.

J. Opt. Soc. Am. (2)

W. Kantor, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 52, 978 (1962).
[Crossref]

G. Babcock and T. Bergman, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 54, 2 (1964).
[Crossref]

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Figures (2)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Experimental arrangement. The beam from the gas-laser light source L is split by the glass plate G. Half of the lower beam B passes through the mica window M which is mounted on the rotating table. The other half of the beam passes through the stationary mica window C. The beams are recombined by the second glass plate, and the resulting interference pattern is observed and photographed at the screen S.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Experimental fringe pattern. The left-hand side of the pattern was formed by superposition of part of beam A (see Fig. 1) with the part of beam B which passed through the stationary compensating plate. The continuous fringes indicate that there is no measurable effect of the moving mica window.