Abstract

Back-projection screens for projection microscopy with high luminance and no loss of definition are described; the screen grain is removed by the slow relative movement of two ground-glass screens placed face to face.

© 1961 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. This source has a luminance of 20 000 stilbs and the theoretical screen luminance under the conditions of use described above is 0.006 stilb; the difference may reasonably be ascribed to reflection and absorption losses and to the difficulty of completely filling the condenser aperture with the image of the part of the source of maximum luminance.
  2. S. Hecht, J. gen. Physiol. 7, 235 (1924).
  3. S. Hecht, Arch. Opthalmol. 57, 564 (1928).
  4. F. A. MacAdam Taylor, Taylor & Hobson Limited, British patent592,815 (1947). See also K. J. Habell and A. Cox, Engineering Optics (Pitman Publishing Corporation, New York, 1948), p. 273.
  5. J. Dyson, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 50, 519 (1960).
    [Crossref]
  6. N. H. Mason, British Patent590, 981 (1947). See also E. Lau and J. Reinitz: “Optik aller Wellenlängen” p. 229 (Berlin, 1959) and E. Lau and R. Schalge, Feingerätetechnik 7, 121 (1958).

1960 (1)

1928 (1)

S. Hecht, Arch. Opthalmol. 57, 564 (1928).

1924 (1)

S. Hecht, J. gen. Physiol. 7, 235 (1924).

Dyson, J.

Hecht, S.

S. Hecht, Arch. Opthalmol. 57, 564 (1928).

S. Hecht, J. gen. Physiol. 7, 235 (1924).

MacAdam Taylor, F. A.

F. A. MacAdam Taylor, Taylor & Hobson Limited, British patent592,815 (1947). See also K. J. Habell and A. Cox, Engineering Optics (Pitman Publishing Corporation, New York, 1948), p. 273.

Mason, N. H.

N. H. Mason, British Patent590, 981 (1947). See also E. Lau and J. Reinitz: “Optik aller Wellenlängen” p. 229 (Berlin, 1959) and E. Lau and R. Schalge, Feingerätetechnik 7, 121 (1958).

Arch. Opthalmol. (1)

S. Hecht, Arch. Opthalmol. 57, 564 (1928).

J. gen. Physiol. (1)

S. Hecht, J. gen. Physiol. 7, 235 (1924).

J. Opt. Soc. Am. (1)

Other (3)

N. H. Mason, British Patent590, 981 (1947). See also E. Lau and J. Reinitz: “Optik aller Wellenlängen” p. 229 (Berlin, 1959) and E. Lau and R. Schalge, Feingerätetechnik 7, 121 (1958).

This source has a luminance of 20 000 stilbs and the theoretical screen luminance under the conditions of use described above is 0.006 stilb; the difference may reasonably be ascribed to reflection and absorption losses and to the difficulty of completely filling the condenser aperture with the image of the part of the source of maximum luminance.

F. A. MacAdam Taylor, Taylor & Hobson Limited, British patent592,815 (1947). See also K. J. Habell and A. Cox, Engineering Optics (Pitman Publishing Corporation, New York, 1948), p. 273.

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Figures (2)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Microphotometer trace across fine, ground-glass screen. Illuminating and collecting apertures both f/80, scanning spot 100μ square. The horizontal line at the top corresponds to 1 mm on the ground-glass screen.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Grainless screen. Light from the microscope eyepiece (lower right) after reflection from three mirrors forms the image on two ground glass screens (upper center) nearly in contact. The image may be viewed through a field lens (upper right) if the screens are etched for high forward transmittance. The ground-glass screen nearest the observer undergoes circular translation in its own plane at about 20 rpm from the motor drive (bottom center). In an alternative arrangement the moving screen is oscillated in its own plane at ac-power-line frequency.