Abstract

The image-splitting principle offers important advantages over the use of filar micrometers or graticules for the measurement of an image transmitted through an optical system. A method for applying this principle to the microscope is described.

Theoretical considerations indicate that a setting accuracy of one-tenth of the radius of the Airy disk should be attainable, and it is shown that under certain conditions no systematic error is introduced. Experiments are described which substantiate these conclusions and illustrate some applications of the instrument.

© 1960 Optical Society of America

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