Abstract

A theory is proposed to account for the color discrimination in the eye which does not require three different kinds of photochemicals or three different kinds of cones. Color discrimination is accomplished by at least three identical receptors positioned at appropriate positions along the outer segment of each cone. Some examples of color matching diagrams that can be obtained with this theory are compared with the CIE color matching diagram. Some comments are made indicating how it might be possible to get three separate signals from three receptors which all are within one cone.

© 1960 Optical Society of America

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Figures (7)

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Equations (10)

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