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  1. Cf. Priest: “Radiant Energy at High Temperatures,” this Journal, p. 178.
  2. See Jour. Op. Soc. Am.,  4, pp. 389–402; 1920.

1920 (1)

See Jour. Op. Soc. Am.,  4, pp. 389–402; 1920.

Priest,

Cf. Priest: “Radiant Energy at High Temperatures,” this Journal, p. 178.

Jour. Op. Soc. Am. (1)

See Jour. Op. Soc. Am.,  4, pp. 389–402; 1920.

this Journal (1)

Cf. Priest: “Radiant Energy at High Temperatures,” this Journal, p. 178.

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Figures (5)

F. 1
F. 1

Probability of recognizing the Planckian stimulus as yellow, white or blue.

F. 2
F. 2

Probability of recognizing the Planckian stimulus as yellow, white or blue.

F. 3
F. 3

Probability of recognizing the Planckian stimulus as yellow, white or blue.

F. 4
F. 4

Probability of recognizing the Planckian stimulus as yellow, white or blue.

F. 5
F. 5

Spectral Distributions of Radiant Energy Evoking the Sensations, White, Yellow and Blue. Dotted curves, 5400° and 4800°K delineate the extreme range of four observers’ final averages in determining the stimulus for white.The solid curve, 6200°K shows the spectral distribution always recognized as blue by all four observers.The solid curve, 4000°K shows the spectral distribution always recognized as yellow by all four observers.The solid curve, 4400°K shows the spectral distribution always recognized as yellow by the three observers of ages less than 35 years.