Abstract

Experiments are reported showing that a variety of clues such as chromatic aberration, spherical aberration, or astigmatism may be used to decide whether a monocularly viewed out-of-focus target requires an increase or decrease of accommodation for it to be refocused. When these clues are removed the initial direction of accommodation readjustment may be in error.

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References

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  1. E. F. Fincham, Brit. J. Ophthalmol. 35, 381 (1951).
  2. F. W. Campbell and J. G. Robson, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 49, 268 (1959).
  3. See G. Westheimer, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 47, 714 (1957), for a description of the double stimulating beam.

Campbell, F. W.

F. W. Campbell and J. G. Robson, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 49, 268 (1959).

Fincham, E. F.

E. F. Fincham, Brit. J. Ophthalmol. 35, 381 (1951).

Robson, J. G.

F. W. Campbell and J. G. Robson, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 49, 268 (1959).

Westheimer, G.

See G. Westheimer, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 47, 714 (1957), for a description of the double stimulating beam.

Other

E. F. Fincham, Brit. J. Ophthalmol. 35, 381 (1951).

F. W. Campbell and J. G. Robson, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 49, 268 (1959).

See G. Westheimer, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 47, 714 (1957), for a description of the double stimulating beam.

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