Abstract

An infrared polarizer is described utilizing the difference in the reflection coefficients for the parallel and perpendicular components of polarization at the principal angle for a germanium-mercury interface. Because of the high degree of polarization observed, two reflections are considered sufficient for most purposes. Such a polarizer should be useful for the wavelength range of two microns to two-tenths of a millimeter; this range could be varied somewhat by choosing other dielectrics.

© 1959 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. N. J. Harrick, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 49, 376 (1959), preceding paper.
    [Crossref]
  2. Brown, Deutsch, and Zwerdling, Lincoln Laboratory Quarterly Progress Report (November, 1957), p. 40.

1959 (1)

Brown,

Brown, Deutsch, and Zwerdling, Lincoln Laboratory Quarterly Progress Report (November, 1957), p. 40.

Deutsch,

Brown, Deutsch, and Zwerdling, Lincoln Laboratory Quarterly Progress Report (November, 1957), p. 40.

Harrick, N. J.

Zwerdling,

Brown, Deutsch, and Zwerdling, Lincoln Laboratory Quarterly Progress Report (November, 1957), p. 40.

J. Opt. Soc. Am. (1)

Other (1)

Brown, Deutsch, and Zwerdling, Lincoln Laboratory Quarterly Progress Report (November, 1957), p. 40.

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Figures (3)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Percentage polarization vs angle of incidence for reflection from various interfaces at three microns.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Some possible configuration for an infrared polarizer. The shaded surfaces are in contact with a suitable metal.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Photograph of infrared polarizer.