Abstract

The atmospheric emission spectrum has been extended from 15 μ to 22.5 μ. Measurements made at Sacramento Peak, New Mexico are described and the emission features identified by comparison with absorption spectra of various atmospheric gases obtained in the laboratory. An asymmetry in the emission spectrum of the clear sky has been observed.

© 1957 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. Sloan, Shaw, and Williams, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 45, 455 (1955).
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  4. M. Migeotte and L. Neven, Astrophys. J. 115, 326 (1952).
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  9. Sloan, Shaw, and Williams, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 46, 543 (1956).
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1956 (2)

1955 (1)

1953 (1)

1952 (3)

M. Migeotte and L. Neven, Astrophys. J. 115, 326 (1952).
[Crossref]

A. Adel, Phys. Rev. 88, 128 (1952).
[Crossref]

Taylor, Benedict, and Strong, J. Chem. Phys. 20, 1884 (1952).
[Crossref]

1947 (1)

A. Adel, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 31, 769 (1947).
[Crossref]

1942 (1)

A. Adel, Astrophys. J. 96, 239 (1942).
[Crossref]

Astrophys. J. (2)

A. Adel, Astrophys. J. 96, 239 (1942).
[Crossref]

M. Migeotte and L. Neven, Astrophys. J. 115, 326 (1952).
[Crossref]

J. Chem. Phys. (1)

Taylor, Benedict, and Strong, J. Chem. Phys. 20, 1884 (1952).
[Crossref]

J. Opt. Soc. Am. (5)

Phys. Rev. (1)

A. Adel, Phys. Rev. 88, 128 (1952).
[Crossref]

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Figures (3)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Spectra observed at various zenith distances on a clear day, September 30, 1955, with ground level air temperature approximately 14°C. D was obtained by viewing one air mass; C, 3 air masses; B, 10 air masses. Curve A is the corresponding spectrum of a laboratory blackbody near ground level air temperature. The absolute humidity was approximately 4 g H2O/m3.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Typical absorption spectra of atmospheric gases compared with a corresponding atmospheric emission spectrum. Curve A is the spectrum of approximately 0.04 precipitable cm H2O; curve B, approximately 1 atmos-cm N2O and 0.04 precipitable cm H2O; curve C, 1 atmos-cm N2O; curve D, about 200 atmos-cm CO2; curve E, 0.04 precipitable cm H2O, 1 atmos-cm N2O and 200 atmos-cm CO2. In each case a path length of 44 m was used and N2 was added to atmospheric pressure. Curve F is a typical zenith sky emission spectrum.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Atmospheric emission spectra obtained by viewing 2 air masses; curve A, spectrum of the eastern sky; curve B, spectrum of the western sky. No visible haze or clouds were present in the directions viewed.