Abstract

The least-squares method for optical correction, described in a previous paper is here modified slightly. An “unsophisticated” bending is used, and this permits the use of lens separations as variables. Two applications of the least-squares procedure lead to a good simultaneous correction in all four pencils used.

© 1956 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. Saul Rosen and Cornelius Eldert, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 44, 250 (1954).
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1954 (1)

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Figures (4)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Entrance points for rays used in five variable least-squares correction.

Fig. 2(a)
Fig. 2(a)

Ray intersections in the paraxial image plane (8° pencil), —— System O, — — — System Q, – – – – System Q*.

Fig. 2(b)
Fig. 2(b)

Ray intersections in the paraxial image plane (16° pencil), —— System O, — — —System Q, – – – – System Q*.

Fig. 2(c)
Fig. 2(c)

Ray intersections in the paraxial image plane (20° pencil), —— System O, — — — System Q, – – – – System Q*.

Tables (2)

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Table II Predicted and traced coordinates in the paraxial image plane.

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Table III Deviations from ideal values in the paraxial image plane.

Equations (2)

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c 1 = - 8.7126985 % , c 3 = - 17.0237690 % , c 5 = + 16.8497420 % , d 2 = + 38.9440580 % , d 4 = - 13.0419885 % .
c 1 = + 1.2947332 % , c 3 = - 5.2155195 % , c 5 = - 8.4358195 % , d 2 = - 4.0556677 % , d 4 = + 2.3516614 % .