Abstract

The carbon arc furnishes the brightest source of infrared readily obtainable, but the interfering absorption spectra of atmospheric CO2 and H2O are difficult to avoid when using it. An infrared source is described consisting of a tungsten ribbon formed in the shape of a cavity, and heated electrically to 2900°K, in an inert atmosphere. The power required is 390 watts. Such a source furnishes a signal two to four times that of the conventional Globar over the rocksalt spectral region. While only about half as bright as the carbon arc, it can be used with an optical path free of atmospheric absorption.

© 1951 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. C. S. Rupert and J. Strong, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 40, 455 (1950).
    [Crossref]
  2. L. Smith, Rev. Sci. Instr. 13, 63 (1942).
    [Crossref]
  3. J. Strong, Procedures in Experimental Physics (Prentice-Hall, Inc., New York, 1938), p. 544.
  4. S. Silverman, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 38, 989 (1948).
  5. E. K. Plyler and J. J. Ball, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 41, 288(A) (1951).

1951 (1)

E. K. Plyler and J. J. Ball, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 41, 288(A) (1951).

1950 (1)

1948 (1)

1942 (1)

L. Smith, Rev. Sci. Instr. 13, 63 (1942).
[Crossref]

Ball, J. J.

E. K. Plyler and J. J. Ball, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 41, 288(A) (1951).

Plyler, E. K.

E. K. Plyler and J. J. Ball, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 41, 288(A) (1951).

Rupert, C. S.

Silverman, S.

Smith, L.

L. Smith, Rev. Sci. Instr. 13, 63 (1942).
[Crossref]

Strong, J.

C. S. Rupert and J. Strong, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 40, 455 (1950).
[Crossref]

J. Strong, Procedures in Experimental Physics (Prentice-Hall, Inc., New York, 1938), p. 544.

J. Opt. Soc. Am. (3)

Rev. Sci. Instr. (1)

L. Smith, Rev. Sci. Instr. 13, 63 (1942).
[Crossref]

Other (1)

J. Strong, Procedures in Experimental Physics (Prentice-Hall, Inc., New York, 1938), p. 544.

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Figures (7)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Incandescent graphite source. The section below the dotted line served only as a mechanical support during manufacture and was removed once the rod was mounted.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

The tungsten filament as finally adopted. The V-shaped opening in the center section is the source, the ends providing means for electrical connection.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Mount and housing for the tungsten source.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

The water-cooled filament mounting, exploded and assembled.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Cut-away view of partially assembled mounting to show the means for introducing flushing gas.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Signal obtained with present tungsten source compared experimentally with that obtained with a 1330°K Globar.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Comparison of carbon-arc signal with that from the tungsten source.