Abstract

The carbon arc furnishes the brightest source of infrared readily obtainable, but the interfering absorption spectra of atmospheric CO2 and H2O are difficult to avoid when using it. An infrared source is described consisting of a tungsten ribbon formed in the shape of a cavity, and heated electrically to 2900°K, in an inert atmosphere. The power required is 390 watts. Such a source furnishes a signal two to four times that of the conventional Globar over the rocksalt spectral region. While only about half as bright as the carbon arc, it can be used with an optical path free of atmospheric absorption.

© 1951 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article
OSA Recommended Articles
Light Sources in the 0.15–20-μ Spectral Range

M. W. P. Cann
Appl. Opt. 8(8) 1645-1661 (1969)

Spectral Radiance of the Carbon Arc Between 2500 Å and 1900 Å

E. Pitz
Appl. Opt. 10(4) 813-818 (1971)

Carbon Arc in a Controlled Atmosphere as a Radiation Standard*

Robert R. Jayroe and R. G. Fowler
J. Opt. Soc. Am. 57(4) 513-516 (1967)

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Figures (7)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription