Abstract

After a short discussion on the theoretical and practical aspect of the use of low temperatures in infrared spectroscopy, details are given of two simply constructed cells in which samples may be cooled with liquid air as the refrigerant. One of these, in which a stainless steel mirror carrying the sample is cooled, provides a means whereby the temperature can be controlled. It is also pointed out that loss of energy from reflection effects at the surface of the solid layer may occur in both the reflection and transmission types of cell.

© 1951 Optical Society of America

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