Abstract

In principle, the use of longer slits is indicated in spectroscopy wherever the resolution is energy limited. Various problems arise, however, as slits are lengthened beyond the conventional limits. This paper sets forth practical solutions to some of these difficulties through the use of an image transformation method, and discusses the advantages and limitations of the schemes suggested.

© 1951 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. John Strong, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 39, 320 (1949).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  2. C. S. Rupert and John Strong, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 40, 455 (1950).
    [Crossref]
  3. I. S. Bowen, Astrophys. J. 88, 113 (1938).
    [Crossref]
  4. F. P. Elby, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 40, 450 (1950).
    [Crossref]

1950 (2)

1949 (1)

1938 (1)

I. S. Bowen, Astrophys. J. 88, 113 (1938).
[Crossref]

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Figures (3)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

The image transformer as applied to a celestial source.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

The image transformer as used between the elements of a dispersing train.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Loss of light due to vignetting.

Equations (1)

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[ F w 0 ( B 0 Θ / ) A l ( d θ / d λ ) T ] 1 2 .