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  8. “Spectral energy characteristics of the constricted mercury vapor lamp—an extremely concentrated source of ultraviolet illumination” (with George Shannon Forbes), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 11, 99 (1925).
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  9. “Line breadths and absorption probabilities in sodium vapor” (with J. C. Slater), Phys. Rev. 26, 176 (1925).
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  12. “The constricted mercury arc as a source of light for photochemical work” (with George S. Forbes), J. Am. Chem. Soc. 47, 2449 (1925).
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  13. “A comparator-microphotometer,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 16, 63 (1928).
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  14. “Intensity relations in the spectra of titanium. I. Line intensities in the stronger multiplets of Ti I and Ti II,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 17, 389 (1928).
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  15. “Intensity relations in the spectra of titanium. II. Relative intensities of the stronger multiplets of Ti I” (with Harry Engwicht), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 18, 287 (1929).
    [Crossref]
  16. “On the elimination of errors when wire screens are used as neutral filters for photographic photometry,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 18, 492 (1929).
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  17. “Intensity relations in the spectra of titanium. III. Intensities in super-multiplets of Ti I,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 19, 109 (1929).
    [Crossref]
  18. “Instruments and methods used for measuring spectral light intensities by photography,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 19, 267 (1929).
    [Crossref]
  19. “Homochromatic spectrophotometry in the extreme ultraviolet” (with Philip A. Leighton), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 20, 313 (1930).
    [Crossref]
  20. “Fluorescent dry plates for photographic photometry” (with Philip A. Leighton), Phys. Rev. 36, 779 (1930).
    [Crossref]
  21. “Intensity summation rules and perturbation effects in complex spectra” (with M. H. Johnson), Phys. Rev. 38, 757 (1931).
    [Crossref]
  22. “Spectral fluorescence efficiencies of certain substances with applications to heterochromatic photographic photometry” (with Philip A. Leighton), Phys. Rev. 38, 899 (1931).
    [Crossref]
  23. “A 21-foot vacuum spectrograph for the extreme ultraviolet,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 2, 600 (1931).
    [Crossref]
  24. “Dichromatic projection microphotometer,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 3, 572 (1932).
    [Crossref]
  25. “Mechanical aid to the analysis of complex spectra,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 3, 753 (1932).
    [Crossref]
  26. “Improved design of the mechanical interval sorter and its application to the analysis of complex spectra,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 4, 581 (1933).
    [Crossref]
  27. “Spectroscopy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology,” Am. Phys. Teacher 1, 109 (1933).
  28. “Improvements in 21-foot normal incidence vacuum spectrograph,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 4, 651 (1933).
    [Crossref]
  29. “Current advances in photographic photometry,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 24, 59 (1934).
    [Crossref]
  30. “Simply constructed ultraviolet monochromators for large area illumination,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 5, 149 (1934).
    [Crossref]
  31. “Automatic measurement, reduction and recording of wave-lengths from spectrograms,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 25, 169 (1935).
    [Crossref]
  32. “The ultraviolet spectrum of ammonia” (with A. B. F. Duncan), Phys. Rev. 49, 211 (1936).
    [Crossref]
  33. “The application of physics to agriculture,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 7, 295 (1936).
    [Crossref]
  34. “Practical possibilities in spectrographic analysis,” Metals and Alloys 7, 290 (1936).
  35. “The applied physicist,” J. App. Phys. 8, 569 (1937).
    [Crossref]
  36. “More precious than rubies,” Harper’s 175, 635 (1937).
  37. “When physics goes farming,” Atlantic Monthly 160, 69 (1937).
  38. “Tomorrow’s telephones,” Tech. Rev. 40, 22 (1937).
  39. Measurement of Radiant Energy, Chapter on Densitometer and Microphotometer, W. E. Forsythe, Editor (McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York, 1937).
  40. “The Frederic Ives Medal for 1937,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 27, 425 (1937).
  41. “Preliminary analysis of the first spark spectrum of cerium-Ce II (with W. E. Albertson), Phys. Rev. 52, 1209 (1937).
    [Crossref]
  42. “Rapid calibration and correction of comparator screws and the photographic production of scales,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 9, 15 (1938).
    [Crossref]
  43. “Spectroscopy in food research,” Food Research 3, 121 (1938).
    [Crossref]
  44. “Spectroscopy in industry,” J. Franklin Inst. 226, 1 (1938).
    [Crossref]
  45. “An interval recorder for analysis of spectra,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 28, 290 (1938).
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  46. “A high speed method of absorption spectrophotometry for the range 10,000 to 2000A,” Proc. Sixth Spectroscopy Conf. (Technology Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1938).
  47. Editor and twenty-seven co-authors, Spectroscopy in Science and, Industry (Technology Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1938).
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  49. “From shellac to symphony,” Tech. Rev. 41, 17 (1938).
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  51. Atoms in Action (William Morrow & Company, New York, 1939), 365 pp.; Armed Services edition, 1945; British edition, Swedish edition, Portuguese edition, 1940; Spanish edition, 1941; Danish edition, 1942; Dutch edition, 1945; German edition, 1947.
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  54. “High speed device for absorption spectrophotometry,” abstract from paper presented to Optical Society of America, October 7, 1938, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 29, 143 (1939).
  55. “Eyes that see through atoms,” Sci. Am.,  161, 132, 212 (1939); Reader’s Digest, 117 (November, 1939).
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  56. “Spectroscopy and its applications at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology,” Sci. Monthly 49, 387 (1939).
  57. Proc. Sixth Spectroscopy Conf., Editor (Technology Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1939).
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  59. “The doctor consults the physicist,” Atlantic Monthly 163, 649 (1939).
  60. “Zeeman effects in complex spectra at fields up to 100,000 gauss” (with F. Bitter), Phys. Rev. 57, 15 (1940).
    [Crossref]
  61. “The testing and use of concave diffraction gratings,” Proc. Seventh Spectroscopy Conf. (Technology Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1940), p. 59.
  62. “New methods in spectroscopy,” Science 91, 225 (1940).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  63. “An improved high speed recording spectrophotometer” (with E. P. Bentley), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 30, 290 (1940).
    [Crossref]
  64. “Photoelectric measurement of scale marks and spectrum lines” (with Julius P. Molnar), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 30, 343 (1940).
    [Crossref]
  65. “Zeeman effects in the arc spectrum of ruthenium” (with J. Rand McNally), Phys. Rev. 58, 703 (1940).
    [Crossref]
  66. “Interactions in the tungsten atom, W. I., in a magnetic field” (with J. H. Roberson and J. E. Mack), Phys. Rev. 58, 895 (1940).
    [Crossref]
  67. Proc. Seventh Spectroscopy Conf., Editor (Technology Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1940).
  68. “What’s the matter with popular science?” Saturday Review of Literature 21, 3 (1940).
  69. “Spectroscopy in industry,” Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution, 1939 (August, 1940), p. 203.
  70. “Zeeman effect data and further classification of the first spark spectrum of cerium-Ce II” (with Walter E. Albertson and Norman F. Hosford), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 31, 439 (1941).
    [Crossref]
  71. “Zeeman effect data and preliminary classification of the spark spectrum of praseodymium-Pr II” (with Nathan Rosen and J. Rand McNally), Phys. Rev. 60, 722 (1941).
    [Crossref]
  72. “The M.I.T. wave-length project,” The Physical Society, Reports on Progress in Physics (Taylor and Francis, Ltd., London, 1941), Vol. 8, p. 212.
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  75. “First spark spectrum of neodymium—preliminary classification and Zeeman effect data” (with W. E. Albertson and J. R. McNally), Phys. Rev. 61, 167 (1942).
    [Crossref]
  76. “First spark spectrum of thorium—classification and Zeeman effect data of Th. II.” (with J. Rand McNally and Helen B. Park), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 32, 334 (1942).
    [Crossref]
  77. “The summer conference on spectroscopy and its applications,” Sci. Monthly 55, 386 (1942).
  78. “Scientist extraordinary,” Tech. Rev. 45, 73 (1942).
  79. “Science at M.I.T.,” Technique, 1944 (June, 1943).
  80. “Zeeman effects in the arc, first spark, and second spark spectra of yttrium” (with J. Rand McNally), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 35, 584 (1945).
    [Crossref]
  81. “Serving through science, ‘the spectroscope: a master key to new materials,’” a radio talk; one of a series delivered by American Scientists on the New York Philharmonic-Symphony Program, U. S. Rubber Company (1945).
  82. “Zeeman effect data for the spectra of lanthanum-La I and La II (with Nathan Rosen and J. Rand McNally), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 35, 658 (1945).
    [Crossref]
  83. “The importance of scientific research in the postwar era,” Science 103, 125 (1946).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  84. “Direct determination of wave-lengths from Fabry-Perot interferometer patterns,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 36, 644 (1946).
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  85. “A hollow cathode source applicable to spectrographic analysis for the halogens and gases” (with J. Rand McNally and Eugene Rowe), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 37, 93 (1947).
    [Crossref]
  86. “The story of engineering,” World Book Encyclopedia (The Quarrie Corporation, Chicago, 1947).
  87. “Industry and the atom,” Am. Gas Ass. Monthly 29, 159 (1947).
  88. “New advances in science,” Food Tech. 2, 45 (1948).
  89. “The sinking of the well,” Accent on Living, Atlantic Monthly 182, 87 (1948).
  90. Practical Spectroscopy (with Richard C. Lord and John R. Loofbourow) (Prentice-Hall, Inc., New York, 1948).
  91. Optics—a history of Divisions 16 and 17, N.D.R.C., by G. H. Kirk Stephenson and Edgar L. Jones. (A section in Applied Physics: Electronics, Optics, and Metallurgy, edited by C. G. Suits, G. R. Harrison, and Louis Jordan, Little Brown & Company (Atlantic Monthly Press), Boston, 1948).
  92. “Spectroscopy,” Encyclopedia Americana (Americana Corporation, New York and Chicago, 1949).
  93. “The production of diffraction gratings. I. The development of the ruling art,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 39, 413 (1949).
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  94. “The production of diffraction gratings. II. The design of echelle gratings and spectrographs,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 39, 522 (1949).
    [Crossref]
  95. “Ultrafrequency excitation of Hg 198 lamps for interferometer illumination” (with Edward Jacobsen), abstract from paper presented to Optical Society of America, October, 1949, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 39, 1054 (1949).

1949 (2)

1948 (2)

“New advances in science,” Food Tech. 2, 45 (1948).

“The sinking of the well,” Accent on Living, Atlantic Monthly 182, 87 (1948).

1947 (2)

1946 (2)

1945 (2)

1943 (1)

“Science at M.I.T.,” Technique, 1944 (June, 1943).

1942 (4)

“First spark spectrum of neodymium—preliminary classification and Zeeman effect data” (with W. E. Albertson and J. R. McNally), Phys. Rev. 61, 167 (1942).
[Crossref]

“The summer conference on spectroscopy and its applications,” Sci. Monthly 55, 386 (1942).

“Scientist extraordinary,” Tech. Rev. 45, 73 (1942).

“First spark spectrum of thorium—classification and Zeeman effect data of Th. II.” (with J. Rand McNally and Helen B. Park), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 32, 334 (1942).
[Crossref]

1941 (2)

“Zeeman effect data and further classification of the first spark spectrum of cerium-Ce II” (with Walter E. Albertson and Norman F. Hosford), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 31, 439 (1941).
[Crossref]

“Zeeman effect data and preliminary classification of the spark spectrum of praseodymium-Pr II” (with Nathan Rosen and J. Rand McNally), Phys. Rev. 60, 722 (1941).
[Crossref]

1940 (7)

“Zeeman effects in the arc spectrum of ruthenium” (with J. Rand McNally), Phys. Rev. 58, 703 (1940).
[Crossref]

“Interactions in the tungsten atom, W. I., in a magnetic field” (with J. H. Roberson and J. E. Mack), Phys. Rev. 58, 895 (1940).
[Crossref]

“What’s the matter with popular science?” Saturday Review of Literature 21, 3 (1940).

“Zeeman effects in complex spectra at fields up to 100,000 gauss” (with F. Bitter), Phys. Rev. 57, 15 (1940).
[Crossref]

“New methods in spectroscopy,” Science 91, 225 (1940).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

“An improved high speed recording spectrophotometer” (with E. P. Bentley), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 30, 290 (1940).
[Crossref]

“Photoelectric measurement of scale marks and spectrum lines” (with Julius P. Molnar), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 30, 343 (1940).
[Crossref]

1939 (4)

“Compilations of spectroscopic data,” J. App. Phys. 10, 760 (1939).
[Crossref]

“Eyes that see through atoms,” Sci. Am.,  161, 132, 212 (1939); Reader’s Digest, 117 (November, 1939).
[Crossref]

“Spectroscopy and its applications at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology,” Sci. Monthly 49, 387 (1939).

“The doctor consults the physicist,” Atlantic Monthly 163, 649 (1939).

1938 (6)

“Apprenticed sunlight,” Tech. Rev. 40, 315 (1938).

“From shellac to symphony,” Tech. Rev. 41, 17 (1938).

“Rapid calibration and correction of comparator screws and the photographic production of scales,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 9, 15 (1938).
[Crossref]

“Spectroscopy in food research,” Food Research 3, 121 (1938).
[Crossref]

“Spectroscopy in industry,” J. Franklin Inst. 226, 1 (1938).
[Crossref]

“An interval recorder for analysis of spectra,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 28, 290 (1938).
[Crossref]

1937 (6)

“The Frederic Ives Medal for 1937,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 27, 425 (1937).

“Preliminary analysis of the first spark spectrum of cerium-Ce II (with W. E. Albertson), Phys. Rev. 52, 1209 (1937).
[Crossref]

“The applied physicist,” J. App. Phys. 8, 569 (1937).
[Crossref]

“More precious than rubies,” Harper’s 175, 635 (1937).

“When physics goes farming,” Atlantic Monthly 160, 69 (1937).

“Tomorrow’s telephones,” Tech. Rev. 40, 22 (1937).

1936 (3)

“The ultraviolet spectrum of ammonia” (with A. B. F. Duncan), Phys. Rev. 49, 211 (1936).
[Crossref]

“The application of physics to agriculture,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 7, 295 (1936).
[Crossref]

“Practical possibilities in spectrographic analysis,” Metals and Alloys 7, 290 (1936).

1935 (1)

1934 (2)

“Current advances in photographic photometry,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 24, 59 (1934).
[Crossref]

“Simply constructed ultraviolet monochromators for large area illumination,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 5, 149 (1934).
[Crossref]

1933 (3)

“Improved design of the mechanical interval sorter and its application to the analysis of complex spectra,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 4, 581 (1933).
[Crossref]

“Spectroscopy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology,” Am. Phys. Teacher 1, 109 (1933).

“Improvements in 21-foot normal incidence vacuum spectrograph,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 4, 651 (1933).
[Crossref]

1932 (2)

“Dichromatic projection microphotometer,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 3, 572 (1932).
[Crossref]

“Mechanical aid to the analysis of complex spectra,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 3, 753 (1932).
[Crossref]

1931 (3)

“Intensity summation rules and perturbation effects in complex spectra” (with M. H. Johnson), Phys. Rev. 38, 757 (1931).
[Crossref]

“Spectral fluorescence efficiencies of certain substances with applications to heterochromatic photographic photometry” (with Philip A. Leighton), Phys. Rev. 38, 899 (1931).
[Crossref]

“A 21-foot vacuum spectrograph for the extreme ultraviolet,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 2, 600 (1931).
[Crossref]

1930 (2)

“Fluorescent dry plates for photographic photometry” (with Philip A. Leighton), Phys. Rev. 36, 779 (1930).
[Crossref]

“Homochromatic spectrophotometry in the extreme ultraviolet” (with Philip A. Leighton), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 20, 313 (1930).
[Crossref]

1929 (4)

1928 (2)

1925 (8)

1924 (2)

1923 (1)

1922 (1)

“The absorption of light by sodium and potassium vapors,” Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 8, 260 (1922).

Albertson, W. E.

“First spark spectrum of neodymium—preliminary classification and Zeeman effect data” (with W. E. Albertson and J. R. McNally), Phys. Rev. 61, 167 (1942).
[Crossref]

“Preliminary analysis of the first spark spectrum of cerium-Ce II (with W. E. Albertson), Phys. Rev. 52, 1209 (1937).
[Crossref]

Albertson, Walter E.

Bentley, E. P.

Bitter, F.

“Zeeman effects in complex spectra at fields up to 100,000 gauss” (with F. Bitter), Phys. Rev. 57, 15 (1940).
[Crossref]

Duncan, A. B. F.

“The ultraviolet spectrum of ammonia” (with A. B. F. Duncan), Phys. Rev. 49, 211 (1936).
[Crossref]

Engwicht, Harry

Forbes, George S.

“The constricted mercury arc as a source of light for photochemical work” (with George S. Forbes), J. Am. Chem. Soc. 47, 2449 (1925).
[Crossref]

Forbes, George Shannon

Hesthal, Cedric E.

Hosford, Norman F.

Jacobsen, Edward

“Ultrafrequency excitation of Hg 198 lamps for interferometer illumination” (with Edward Jacobsen), abstract from paper presented to Optical Society of America, October, 1949, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 39, 1054 (1949).

Johnson, M. H.

“Intensity summation rules and perturbation effects in complex spectra” (with M. H. Johnson), Phys. Rev. 38, 757 (1931).
[Crossref]

Jones, Edgar L.

Optics—a history of Divisions 16 and 17, N.D.R.C., by G. H. Kirk Stephenson and Edgar L. Jones. (A section in Applied Physics: Electronics, Optics, and Metallurgy, edited by C. G. Suits, G. R. Harrison, and Louis Jordan, Little Brown & Company (Atlantic Monthly Press), Boston, 1948).

Kirk Stephenson, G. H.

Optics—a history of Divisions 16 and 17, N.D.R.C., by G. H. Kirk Stephenson and Edgar L. Jones. (A section in Applied Physics: Electronics, Optics, and Metallurgy, edited by C. G. Suits, G. R. Harrison, and Louis Jordan, Little Brown & Company (Atlantic Monthly Press), Boston, 1948).

Leighton, Philip A.

“Spectral fluorescence efficiencies of certain substances with applications to heterochromatic photographic photometry” (with Philip A. Leighton), Phys. Rev. 38, 899 (1931).
[Crossref]

“Homochromatic spectrophotometry in the extreme ultraviolet” (with Philip A. Leighton), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 20, 313 (1930).
[Crossref]

“Fluorescent dry plates for photographic photometry” (with Philip A. Leighton), Phys. Rev. 36, 779 (1930).
[Crossref]

Loofbourow, John R.

Practical Spectroscopy (with Richard C. Lord and John R. Loofbourow) (Prentice-Hall, Inc., New York, 1948).

Lord, Richard C.

Practical Spectroscopy (with Richard C. Lord and John R. Loofbourow) (Prentice-Hall, Inc., New York, 1948).

Mack, J. E.

“Interactions in the tungsten atom, W. I., in a magnetic field” (with J. H. Roberson and J. E. Mack), Phys. Rev. 58, 895 (1940).
[Crossref]

McNally, J. R.

“First spark spectrum of neodymium—preliminary classification and Zeeman effect data” (with W. E. Albertson and J. R. McNally), Phys. Rev. 61, 167 (1942).
[Crossref]

Molnar, Julius P.

Park, Helen B.

Rand McNally, J.

Roberson, J. H.

“Interactions in the tungsten atom, W. I., in a magnetic field” (with J. H. Roberson and J. E. Mack), Phys. Rev. 58, 895 (1940).
[Crossref]

Rosen, Nathan

“Zeeman effect data for the spectra of lanthanum-La I and La II (with Nathan Rosen and J. Rand McNally), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 35, 658 (1945).
[Crossref]

“Zeeman effect data and preliminary classification of the spark spectrum of praseodymium-Pr II” (with Nathan Rosen and J. Rand McNally), Phys. Rev. 60, 722 (1941).
[Crossref]

Rowe, Eugene

Slater, J. C.

“Line breadths and absorption probabilities in sodium vapor” (with J. C. Slater), Phys. Rev. 26, 176 (1925).
[Crossref]

Accent on Living, Atlantic Monthly (1)

“The sinking of the well,” Accent on Living, Atlantic Monthly 182, 87 (1948).

Am. Gas Ass. Monthly (1)

“Industry and the atom,” Am. Gas Ass. Monthly 29, 159 (1947).

Am. Phys. Teacher (1)

“Spectroscopy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology,” Am. Phys. Teacher 1, 109 (1933).

Atlantic Monthly (2)

“When physics goes farming,” Atlantic Monthly 160, 69 (1937).

“The doctor consults the physicist,” Atlantic Monthly 163, 649 (1939).

Food Research (1)

“Spectroscopy in food research,” Food Research 3, 121 (1938).
[Crossref]

Food Tech. (1)

“New advances in science,” Food Tech. 2, 45 (1948).

Harper’s (1)

“More precious than rubies,” Harper’s 175, 635 (1937).

J. Am. Chem. Soc. (1)

“The constricted mercury arc as a source of light for photochemical work” (with George S. Forbes), J. Am. Chem. Soc. 47, 2449 (1925).
[Crossref]

J. App. Phys. (2)

“The applied physicist,” J. App. Phys. 8, 569 (1937).
[Crossref]

“Compilations of spectroscopic data,” J. App. Phys. 10, 760 (1939).
[Crossref]

J. Franklin Inst. (1)

“Spectroscopy in industry,” J. Franklin Inst. 226, 1 (1938).
[Crossref]

J. Opt. Soc. Am. (28)

“An interval recorder for analysis of spectra,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 28, 290 (1938).
[Crossref]

“Current advances in photographic photometry,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 24, 59 (1934).
[Crossref]

“Automatic measurement, reduction and recording of wave-lengths from spectrograms,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 25, 169 (1935).
[Crossref]

“A comparator-microphotometer,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 16, 63 (1928).
[Crossref]

“Intensity relations in the spectra of titanium. I. Line intensities in the stronger multiplets of Ti I and Ti II,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 17, 389 (1928).
[Crossref]

“Intensity relations in the spectra of titanium. II. Relative intensities of the stronger multiplets of Ti I” (with Harry Engwicht), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 18, 287 (1929).
[Crossref]

“On the elimination of errors when wire screens are used as neutral filters for photographic photometry,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 18, 492 (1929).
[Crossref]

“Intensity relations in the spectra of titanium. III. Intensities in super-multiplets of Ti I,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 19, 109 (1929).
[Crossref]

“Instruments and methods used for measuring spectral light intensities by photography,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 19, 267 (1929).
[Crossref]

“Homochromatic spectrophotometry in the extreme ultraviolet” (with Philip A. Leighton), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 20, 313 (1930).
[Crossref]

“A simple densitometer for accurate work,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 7, 999 (1923).
[Crossref]

“Photographic photometry in the ultraviolet” (with Cedric E. Hesthal), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 8, 471 (1924).
[Crossref]

“Spectral energy characteristics of the mercury vapor lamp” (with George Shannon Forbes), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 10, 1 (1925).
[Crossref]

“Precision densitometers for photographic photometry,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 10, 157 (1925).
[Crossref]

“Spectral energy characteristics of the constricted mercury vapor lamp—an extremely concentrated source of ultraviolet illumination” (with George Shannon Forbes), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 11, 99 (1925).
[Crossref]

“Photographic sensitometry with fluorescent oils,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 11, 113 (1925).
[Crossref]

“Characteristics of photographic materials in the ultraviolet,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 11, 341 (1925).
[Crossref]

“The Frederic Ives Medal for 1937,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 27, 425 (1937).

“An improved high speed recording spectrophotometer” (with E. P. Bentley), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 30, 290 (1940).
[Crossref]

“Photoelectric measurement of scale marks and spectrum lines” (with Julius P. Molnar), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 30, 343 (1940).
[Crossref]

“Zeeman effect data and further classification of the first spark spectrum of cerium-Ce II” (with Walter E. Albertson and Norman F. Hosford), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 31, 439 (1941).
[Crossref]

“First spark spectrum of thorium—classification and Zeeman effect data of Th. II.” (with J. Rand McNally and Helen B. Park), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 32, 334 (1942).
[Crossref]

“Zeeman effects in the arc, first spark, and second spark spectra of yttrium” (with J. Rand McNally), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 35, 584 (1945).
[Crossref]

“The production of diffraction gratings. I. The development of the ruling art,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 39, 413 (1949).
[Crossref]

“The production of diffraction gratings. II. The design of echelle gratings and spectrographs,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 39, 522 (1949).
[Crossref]

“Zeeman effect data for the spectra of lanthanum-La I and La II (with Nathan Rosen and J. Rand McNally), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 35, 658 (1945).
[Crossref]

“Direct determination of wave-lengths from Fabry-Perot interferometer patterns,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 36, 644 (1946).
[Crossref]

“A hollow cathode source applicable to spectrographic analysis for the halogens and gases” (with J. Rand McNally and Eugene Rowe), J. Opt. Soc. Am. 37, 93 (1947).
[Crossref]

Metals and Alloys (1)

“Practical possibilities in spectrographic analysis,” Metals and Alloys 7, 290 (1936).

Phys. Rev. (13)

“The ultraviolet spectrum of ammonia” (with A. B. F. Duncan), Phys. Rev. 49, 211 (1936).
[Crossref]

“Line breadths and absorption probabilities in sodium vapor” (with J. C. Slater), Phys. Rev. 26, 176 (1925).
[Crossref]

“Experimental determination of relative transition probabilities in the sodium atom,” Phys. Rev. 25, 768 (1925).
[Crossref]

“Series limit absorption in sodium vapor,” Phys. Rev. 24, 466 (1924).
[Crossref]

“Fluorescent dry plates for photographic photometry” (with Philip A. Leighton), Phys. Rev. 36, 779 (1930).
[Crossref]

“Intensity summation rules and perturbation effects in complex spectra” (with M. H. Johnson), Phys. Rev. 38, 757 (1931).
[Crossref]

“Spectral fluorescence efficiencies of certain substances with applications to heterochromatic photographic photometry” (with Philip A. Leighton), Phys. Rev. 38, 899 (1931).
[Crossref]

“First spark spectrum of neodymium—preliminary classification and Zeeman effect data” (with W. E. Albertson and J. R. McNally), Phys. Rev. 61, 167 (1942).
[Crossref]

“Zeeman effect data and preliminary classification of the spark spectrum of praseodymium-Pr II” (with Nathan Rosen and J. Rand McNally), Phys. Rev. 60, 722 (1941).
[Crossref]

“Zeeman effects in complex spectra at fields up to 100,000 gauss” (with F. Bitter), Phys. Rev. 57, 15 (1940).
[Crossref]

“Zeeman effects in the arc spectrum of ruthenium” (with J. Rand McNally), Phys. Rev. 58, 703 (1940).
[Crossref]

“Interactions in the tungsten atom, W. I., in a magnetic field” (with J. H. Roberson and J. E. Mack), Phys. Rev. 58, 895 (1940).
[Crossref]

“Preliminary analysis of the first spark spectrum of cerium-Ce II (with W. E. Albertson), Phys. Rev. 52, 1209 (1937).
[Crossref]

Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. (1)

“The absorption of light by sodium and potassium vapors,” Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 8, 260 (1922).

Rev. Sci. Inst. (8)

“The application of physics to agriculture,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 7, 295 (1936).
[Crossref]

“Simply constructed ultraviolet monochromators for large area illumination,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 5, 149 (1934).
[Crossref]

“Improvements in 21-foot normal incidence vacuum spectrograph,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 4, 651 (1933).
[Crossref]

“A 21-foot vacuum spectrograph for the extreme ultraviolet,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 2, 600 (1931).
[Crossref]

“Dichromatic projection microphotometer,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 3, 572 (1932).
[Crossref]

“Mechanical aid to the analysis of complex spectra,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 3, 753 (1932).
[Crossref]

“Improved design of the mechanical interval sorter and its application to the analysis of complex spectra,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 4, 581 (1933).
[Crossref]

“Rapid calibration and correction of comparator screws and the photographic production of scales,” Rev. Sci. Inst. 9, 15 (1938).
[Crossref]

Saturday Review of Literature (1)

“What’s the matter with popular science?” Saturday Review of Literature 21, 3 (1940).

Sci. Am. (1)

“Eyes that see through atoms,” Sci. Am.,  161, 132, 212 (1939); Reader’s Digest, 117 (November, 1939).
[Crossref]

Sci. Monthly (2)

“Spectroscopy and its applications at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology,” Sci. Monthly 49, 387 (1939).

“The summer conference on spectroscopy and its applications,” Sci. Monthly 55, 386 (1942).

Science (2)

“New methods in spectroscopy,” Science 91, 225 (1940).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

“The importance of scientific research in the postwar era,” Science 103, 125 (1946).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

Tech. Rev. (4)

“Scientist extraordinary,” Tech. Rev. 45, 73 (1942).

“Apprenticed sunlight,” Tech. Rev. 40, 315 (1938).

“From shellac to symphony,” Tech. Rev. 41, 17 (1938).

“Tomorrow’s telephones,” Tech. Rev. 40, 22 (1937).

Technique (1)

“Science at M.I.T.,” Technique, 1944 (June, 1943).

Other (21)

“Serving through science, ‘the spectroscope: a master key to new materials,’” a radio talk; one of a series delivered by American Scientists on the New York Philharmonic-Symphony Program, U. S. Rubber Company (1945).

“Spectroscopy in industry,” Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution, 1939 (August, 1940), p. 203.

“The testing and use of concave diffraction gratings,” Proc. Seventh Spectroscopy Conf. (Technology Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1940), p. 59.

“The M.I.T. wave-length project,” The Physical Society, Reports on Progress in Physics (Taylor and Francis, Ltd., London, 1941), Vol. 8, p. 212.
[Crossref]

Chapter in New Worlds in Science (Robert McBride, New York, 1941).

How Things Work (William Morrow & Company, New York, 1941, 1945), 300 pp.; Swedish edition, 1942; British edition, 1943; Italian edition, 1948; Japanese edition, 1948.

Atoms in Action (William Morrow & Company, New York, 1939), 365 pp.; Armed Services edition, 1945; British edition, Swedish edition, Portuguese edition, 1940; Spanish edition, 1941; Danish edition, 1942; Dutch edition, 1945; German edition, 1947.

M. I. T. Wavelength Tables, Editor (John Wiley & Sons, Inc., and Technology Press, New York, 1939).

“Spectroscopic photography,” Chapter in Handbook of Photography (McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York, 1939), p. 804.

“High speed device for absorption spectrophotometry,” abstract from paper presented to Optical Society of America, October 7, 1938, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 29, 143 (1939).

Proc. Sixth Spectroscopy Conf., Editor (Technology Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1939).

“New tables of spectral lines,” Proc. Sixth Spectroscopy Conf. (Technology Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1939), p. 118.

Proc. Seventh Spectroscopy Conf., Editor (Technology Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1940).

Measurement of Radiant Energy, Chapter on Densitometer and Microphotometer, W. E. Forsythe, Editor (McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York, 1937).

“A high speed method of absorption spectrophotometry for the range 10,000 to 2000A,” Proc. Sixth Spectroscopy Conf. (Technology Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1938).

Editor and twenty-seven co-authors, Spectroscopy in Science and, Industry (Technology Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1938).

“The story of engineering,” World Book Encyclopedia (The Quarrie Corporation, Chicago, 1947).

Practical Spectroscopy (with Richard C. Lord and John R. Loofbourow) (Prentice-Hall, Inc., New York, 1948).

Optics—a history of Divisions 16 and 17, N.D.R.C., by G. H. Kirk Stephenson and Edgar L. Jones. (A section in Applied Physics: Electronics, Optics, and Metallurgy, edited by C. G. Suits, G. R. Harrison, and Louis Jordan, Little Brown & Company (Atlantic Monthly Press), Boston, 1948).

“Spectroscopy,” Encyclopedia Americana (Americana Corporation, New York and Chicago, 1949).

“Ultrafrequency excitation of Hg 198 lamps for interferometer illumination” (with Edward Jacobsen), abstract from paper presented to Optical Society of America, October, 1949, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 39, 1054 (1949).

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