Abstract

An underwater camera lens covering a half-field of 37.5° is described. The area imaged with this lens is more than seven times that covered with the customary arrangement of a conventional camera lens behind a plane window.

© 1950 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. M. Ewing, A. Vine, and J. L. Worzel, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 36, 307 (1946).
    [Crossref]

1946 (1)

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Figures (4)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Positions of images of a distant object formed by a spherical window with radii of 25.4 and 38.1 mm. Abscissas represent distances in front of the aperture stop in millimeters. Ordinates represent distances perpendicular to the axis in millimeters. Tangential images are marked “P” and radial images “S.” The maximum half-field is 30°. The distances of the aperture stop behind the center of curvature of the window surfaces are: (A) 0, (B) 12.7 mm, (C) 25.4 mm, (D) 31.7 mm.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Wide-angle camera lens. Dimensions are in millimeters.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Bottom off north shore of Bermuda. Daylight, f/22, 4 1 2 ft. off bottom, half-field 37.5°, depth 10 ft.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Bottom of swimming pool. Three No. 5 flash bulbs, f/11, 4 1 2 ft. off bottom, half-field 37.5°.

Tables (1)

Tables Icon

Table I Lateral chromatic aberration of a 50-mm camera lens behind a plane surface with water filling the object space.