Abstract

The recording system employs a contact-modulated amplifier and self-balancing potentiometer in an electrical null circuit including variable response speed and gain. The control system automatically adjusts the slits and zero at preselected prism positions. Familiar spectra illustrate the effects of variables such as slit width, recording speed, and response speed.

© 1947 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. Max D. Liston, C. E. Quinn, W. E. Sargeant, and G. G. Scott, Rev. Sci. Inst. 17, 194 (1946).
  2. E. J Martin, A. W. Fischer, B. Mandel, and R. E. Nusbaum, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 37, 897 (1947).

1947 (1)

E. J Martin, A. W. Fischer, B. Mandel, and R. E. Nusbaum, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 37, 897 (1947).

1946 (1)

Max D. Liston, C. E. Quinn, W. E. Sargeant, and G. G. Scott, Rev. Sci. Inst. 17, 194 (1946).

Fischer, A. W.

E. J Martin, A. W. Fischer, B. Mandel, and R. E. Nusbaum, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 37, 897 (1947).

Liston, Max D.

Max D. Liston, C. E. Quinn, W. E. Sargeant, and G. G. Scott, Rev. Sci. Inst. 17, 194 (1946).

Mandel, B.

E. J Martin, A. W. Fischer, B. Mandel, and R. E. Nusbaum, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 37, 897 (1947).

Martin, E. J

E. J Martin, A. W. Fischer, B. Mandel, and R. E. Nusbaum, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 37, 897 (1947).

Nusbaum, R. E.

E. J Martin, A. W. Fischer, B. Mandel, and R. E. Nusbaum, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 37, 897 (1947).

Quinn, C. E.

Max D. Liston, C. E. Quinn, W. E. Sargeant, and G. G. Scott, Rev. Sci. Inst. 17, 194 (1946).

Sargeant, W. E.

Max D. Liston, C. E. Quinn, W. E. Sargeant, and G. G. Scott, Rev. Sci. Inst. 17, 194 (1946).

Scott, G. G.

Max D. Liston, C. E. Quinn, W. E. Sargeant, and G. G. Scott, Rev. Sci. Inst. 17, 194 (1946).

J. Opt. Soc. Am. (1)

E. J Martin, A. W. Fischer, B. Mandel, and R. E. Nusbaum, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 37, 897 (1947).

Rev. Sci. Inst. (1)

Max D. Liston, C. E. Quinn, W. E. Sargeant, and G. G. Scott, Rev. Sci. Inst. 17, 194 (1946).

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Figures (20)

F. 1
F. 1

The contact-modulated amplifier may be combined with recorders in a variety of circuits.

F. 2
F. 2

Adding feedback to the contact-modulated amplifier improves speed of response.

F. 3
F. 3

The recording system is of the null-type employing negative feedback for faster response.

F. 4
F. 4

With this circuit, slits are automatically adjusted according to a preset program.

F. 5
F. 5

Slit adjustments are programmed by connecting groups of commutator segments to variable potentiometers.

F. 6
F. 6

An electronic timer controls drives, shutter, slits, and zero in an automatic adjustment sequence.

F. 7
F. 7

Controls are centralized in the console.

F. 8
F. 8

Rear view of console shows amplifier and control chassis.

F. 9
F. 9

Response speed of the electrical system is limited by the recorder as well as by the filter.

F. 10
F. 10

For small signals the thermopile may limit the response speed.

F. 11
F. 11

Noise increases with response speed.

F. 12
F. 12

There is a maximum recording speed for good fidelity with a given response speed.

F. 13
F. 13

The CO2 band at 15μ is scanned with 0.6-mm slits with good reproducibility.

F. 14
F. 14

Higher resolving power is obtained by narrowing the slits to 0.4 mm.

F. 15
F. 15

Surrounding the prism with air shifts the recorded band position.

F. 16
F. 16

For a given set of conditions, band definition passes through a maximum as slits are narrowed.

F. 17
F. 17

Resolving power is increased with narrower slits and increased gain.

F. 18
F. 18

Good reproducibility is obtained on duplicate records of the 6μ water-vapor band.

F. 19
F. 19

Background compared to ammonia spectrum under normal automatic recording conditions.

F. 20
F. 20

Increasing the resolving power improves the analytical curves for close band pairs.