Abstract

The conventional method of quantitative spectrochemical analysis employing bright-line spectra and photographic recording is discussed with reference to the various steps involved. The steps which may be eliminated by the application of direct photoelectric recording are considered and a method based on this type of recording is discussed. A detailed comparison of the two methods is made which leads to the conclusion that only by designing an entirely new spectrum-dispersing instrument can “direct reading” be made sufficiently flexible for general adaptation. Such an instrument is considered in detail together with suitable analytical procedure for its use. The probable speed and accuracy attainable are illustrated by examples. Present limitations and future developments are considered. A proposed instrument is announced.

© 1944 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. G. R. Harrison, “Some future possibilities of spectrographic analysis,” Conference on Spectroscopy and Its Applications, Cambridge (1940).
  2. O. S. Duffendack and W. E. Morris, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 32, 8–24 (1942).
    [Crossref]
  3. D. H. Rank, R. J. Pfister, and P. D. Coleman, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 32, 390–396 (1942).
    [Crossref]
  4. E. A. Boettner and G. P. Brewington, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 34, 6–11 (1944).
    [Crossref]
  5. M. F. Hasler and J. W. Kemp, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 34, 21–32 (1944).
    [Crossref]

1944 (2)

1942 (2)

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Figures (5)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Photoelectric receivers and mirrors in an experimental direct reading instrument.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Counter panel showing dials, each of which is calibrated directly in percentage composition of element being measured.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Resolving power test. Profile study of manganese triplet showing complete resolution of two lines 2.21A apart and incomplete resolution of two lines 1.42A apart.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Working curves for the quantitative determination of copper and magnesium in aluminum, obtained with the direct reading instrument.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Working curve for the quantitative determination of chromium in steel, obtained with the direct reading instrument.

Tables (2)

Tables Icon

Table I Spectrochemical analysis.

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Table II Reproducibility of measurement.