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References

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  1. H. Knapp, Arch. Ophth. and Otol. 1, 377 (1870).
  2. H. M. Burian and K. N. Ogle, Am. J. Ophthal. 26 (May, 1943).
  3. E. Tron, Arch. f. Ophthal. 132, 182–223 (1934); also Arch. f. Ophthal. 133, 211–230 (1935). L. Paul, Arch. f. Ophthal. 133, 254 (1935).
  4. K. N. Ogle, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 26, 323 (1936).
    [Crossref]
  5. In view of the fact that a certain percentage of the anisometropic cases studied had residual size corrections which could not be attributed wholly to spherical anisometropia, it is probable that there would be some cases in which even the residual size correction though over-all might be due to factors other than dioptric.

1943 (1)

H. M. Burian and K. N. Ogle, Am. J. Ophthal. 26 (May, 1943).

1936 (1)

1934 (1)

E. Tron, Arch. f. Ophthal. 132, 182–223 (1934); also Arch. f. Ophthal. 133, 211–230 (1935). L. Paul, Arch. f. Ophthal. 133, 254 (1935).

1870 (1)

H. Knapp, Arch. Ophth. and Otol. 1, 377 (1870).

Burian, H. M.

H. M. Burian and K. N. Ogle, Am. J. Ophthal. 26 (May, 1943).

Knapp, H.

H. Knapp, Arch. Ophth. and Otol. 1, 377 (1870).

Ogle, K. N.

H. M. Burian and K. N. Ogle, Am. J. Ophthal. 26 (May, 1943).

K. N. Ogle, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 26, 323 (1936).
[Crossref]

Tron, E.

E. Tron, Arch. f. Ophthal. 132, 182–223 (1934); also Arch. f. Ophthal. 133, 211–230 (1935). L. Paul, Arch. f. Ophthal. 133, 254 (1935).

Am. J. Ophthal. (1)

H. M. Burian and K. N. Ogle, Am. J. Ophthal. 26 (May, 1943).

Arch. f. Ophthal. (1)

E. Tron, Arch. f. Ophthal. 132, 182–223 (1934); also Arch. f. Ophthal. 133, 211–230 (1935). L. Paul, Arch. f. Ophthal. 133, 254 (1935).

Arch. Ophth. and Otol. (1)

H. Knapp, Arch. Ophth. and Otol. 1, 377 (1870).

J. Opt. Soc. Am. (1)

Other (1)

In view of the fact that a certain percentage of the anisometropic cases studied had residual size corrections which could not be attributed wholly to spherical anisometropia, it is probable that there would be some cases in which even the residual size correction though over-all might be due to factors other than dioptric.

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Figures (9)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Scheme of a normal or emmetropic eye.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Schematic axially ametropic (myopic) eye, showing that the retinal image is the same size as though the eye were emmetropic.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Schematic refractive ametropic (myopic) eye showing that the size of the retinal image is different in the corrected eye from that if the eye were emmetropic.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Graph showing the increase in index myopia, in an illustrative case of refractive ametropia associated with a nuclear sclerosis of the crystalline lens of the right eye. (Reprinted by permission of the American Journal of Ophthalmology.)

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Graph showing the increase in the measured and computed differences in the size of the images in the two eyes (aniseikonia) that accompanied the increase in index myopia of one eye in the illustrative case. (Reprinted by permission of the American Journal of Ophthalmology.)

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Histogram illustrating data determined by E. Tron [Arch. f. Ophthal. 132, 182 (1934)] on the incidence of axial and combination of axial and refractive ametropia in different degrees of refractive anomalies of the eye.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Graph redrawn from that given by L. Paul [Arch. f. Ophthal. 133, 254 (1935)] showing variation in computed axial length of eyes of different refractive anomalies.

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

Scatter diagram showing distribution of cases of spherical anisometropia and image size corrections (aniseikonia) when the astigmatic error in the two eyes differed by 0.5 diopter or less. Points along the abscissa indicate an axial anisometropia; points approaching the maximum effect line indicate a greater degree of refractive spherical anisometropia.

Fig. 9
Fig. 9

Scatter diagram of available cases showing distribution of cases of spherical anisometropia and the residual image size difference (aniseikonia) corrections when the effect of the correction of the astigmatic errors is eliminated. Points along the abscissa indicate an axial anisometropia; these approaching the maximum effect line indicate greater degrees of refractive spherical ametropia.

Tables (1)

Tables Icon

Table I Table showing typical cases analyzed in the study of the relationship between spherical anisometropia and residual correction for the measured difference in size between the images of the two eyes.