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Figures (12)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Relative near ultraviolet (black light) energy radiated by incandescent lamp filaments of equal wattage operating at 2800°K and 3400°K. The higher temperature (photoflood filament) is about 5 times as effective as the lower which is that of standard 60-watt general lighting lamps.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Relative fluorescence (pair 5) and phosphorescence (pair 6) of zinc sulfide under equal wattages with incandescent filaments at 3400°K (left) and 2800°K (right).

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Strontium sulfide is similar to zinc sulfide in its greater reaction to the higher filament temperatures.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Fluorescent dyes show relatively higher reaction to 3400°K incancandescent filament activation.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Visible spectra of high, medium and low pressure mercury vapor arcs. The upper spectrum is that of the 1000-watt water-cooled quartz capillary lamp which operates at high pressure. The middle strip shows the medium pressure 400-watt A-H1 mercury vapor lamp and the bottom shows the low pressure Sterilamp. Note the widening of lines and bands as the pressure rises. This also occurs in the ultraviolet region.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

The radiant energy of the standard daylight Mazda F lamp is mostly a continuous band with a small amount of mercury line spectrum. Rich in blue light these lamps are efficient activators of chief value with phosphorescent materials.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

The new “360 BL” phosphor radiates much energy in a band in the near-ultraviolet. The mercury vapor spectral lines shown as blocks in the diagram add to the efficiency of “black light” production.

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

The recommended circuit for the 4-watt 24–28 volt RP-12 bulb lamp for aircraft instrument lighting.

Fig. 9
Fig. 9

Phosphorescence developed by activation with equal wattages of (left to right) mercury vapor, 360 BL and daylight tubular fluorescent, 360 BL RP-12 fluorescent, sterilamp, argon glow and general lighting incandescent lamps. Upper series—zinc sulfide; lower series—strontium sulfide.

Fig. 10
Fig. 10

Fluorescence of zinc sulfide activated by equal wattages of (left to right) mercury vapor, 360 BL and daylight tubular fluorescent, 360 BL RP-12 fluorescent, argon glow and general lighting incandescent lamps.

Fig. 11
Fig. 11

Fluorescence of blue (top row), yellow (middle row) and red (bottom row) dyes activated by equal wattages of the six different types of lamps. Mercury vapor lamps and fluorescent lamps with 360 BL phosphor are about equally efficient.

Fig. 12
Fig. 12

Transmission data on Corning ultraviolet filter glasses.

Tables (3)

Tables Icon

Table VII Visual estimates of phosphorescent brightness, in percent.

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Table VIII Relative fluorescent brightness (percent footlamberts) measurements. Two samples of zinc sulfide.

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Table IX Photometric brightness (footlamberts) measurements of fluorescence of organic dyes.