Abstract

Quite different indirect stimuli often produce similar changes in the color sensitivity of the eye. It was assumed that this similarity of effect is due to all these indirect stimuli being similar as to their influence upon the autonomic nervous system. Direct experiments with instillation of adrenalin and pilocarpin into the eye have shown that color sensitivity does change when affected by these sympathico- and parasympathico-mimetic substances. In the light of the dependence of color vision on the autonomic nervous system, it is also possible to account for the seasonal fluctuations of color sensitivity recently described in special papers.

© 1941 Optical Society of America

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