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  1. For an exact description of these lenses see, K. N. Ogle, “The Correction of Aniseikonia with Ophthalmic Lenses,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 26, 323–337 (1936).
    [Crossref]
  2. A. Ames, “Aniseikonia: A Factor in the Functioning of Vision,” Am. J. Ophthalm. 18, 1014 (1935).
  3. Kenneth N. Ogle, “Induced Size Effect. I. A New Phenomenon in Binocular Space Perception Associated with the Relative Sizes of the Images of the Two Eyes,” Arch. Ophthalm. 20, 604–623 (1938); II. An Experimental Study of the Phenomenon with Restricted Fusion Stimuli, ibid. 21, 604–625 (1939); III. A Study of the Phenomenon as influenced by Horizontal Disparity of the Fusion Contours, ibid. 22, 613–635 (1939); Induced Size Effect with the Eyes in Asymmetric Convergence, ibid. (in press).
    [Crossref]

1938 (1)

Kenneth N. Ogle, “Induced Size Effect. I. A New Phenomenon in Binocular Space Perception Associated with the Relative Sizes of the Images of the Two Eyes,” Arch. Ophthalm. 20, 604–623 (1938); II. An Experimental Study of the Phenomenon with Restricted Fusion Stimuli, ibid. 21, 604–625 (1939); III. A Study of the Phenomenon as influenced by Horizontal Disparity of the Fusion Contours, ibid. 22, 613–635 (1939); Induced Size Effect with the Eyes in Asymmetric Convergence, ibid. (in press).
[Crossref]

1936 (1)

1935 (1)

A. Ames, “Aniseikonia: A Factor in the Functioning of Vision,” Am. J. Ophthalm. 18, 1014 (1935).

Ames, A.

A. Ames, “Aniseikonia: A Factor in the Functioning of Vision,” Am. J. Ophthalm. 18, 1014 (1935).

Ogle, K. N.

Ogle, Kenneth N.

Kenneth N. Ogle, “Induced Size Effect. I. A New Phenomenon in Binocular Space Perception Associated with the Relative Sizes of the Images of the Two Eyes,” Arch. Ophthalm. 20, 604–623 (1938); II. An Experimental Study of the Phenomenon with Restricted Fusion Stimuli, ibid. 21, 604–625 (1939); III. A Study of the Phenomenon as influenced by Horizontal Disparity of the Fusion Contours, ibid. 22, 613–635 (1939); Induced Size Effect with the Eyes in Asymmetric Convergence, ibid. (in press).
[Crossref]

Am. J. Ophthalm. (1)

A. Ames, “Aniseikonia: A Factor in the Functioning of Vision,” Am. J. Ophthalm. 18, 1014 (1935).

Arch. Ophthalm. (1)

Kenneth N. Ogle, “Induced Size Effect. I. A New Phenomenon in Binocular Space Perception Associated with the Relative Sizes of the Images of the Two Eyes,” Arch. Ophthalm. 20, 604–623 (1938); II. An Experimental Study of the Phenomenon with Restricted Fusion Stimuli, ibid. 21, 604–625 (1939); III. A Study of the Phenomenon as influenced by Horizontal Disparity of the Fusion Contours, ibid. 22, 613–635 (1939); Induced Size Effect with the Eyes in Asymmetric Convergence, ibid. (in press).
[Crossref]

J. Opt. Soc. Am. (1)

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Figures (10)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of the so-called “size” lens used for introducing differences between the relative sizes of the images of the two eyes.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Illustration of the apparent rotation of a plane (geometrical effect) caused by placing before one eye a meridional size lens which magnifies the image in the horizontal meridian only.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Schematic drawing of the apparatus used to obtain data showing the geometrical and induced size effects. (Reprinted from the Archives of Ophthalmology20, 608 (1938).)

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Graphical representation of typical data for the geometrical and induced size effects. The data are the apparent rotations (in degrees) of the test plane caused by differences in the sizes of the images (in percent) introduced by meridional size lenses before one or the other of the eyes. The visual distance is 40 cm. (Reprinted from the Archives of Ophthalmology20, 618 (1938).)

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

A graphical illustration of typical sets of data (for K.N.O. [top] and G.S.N.) showing the induced size effect for image size differences out to 20 percent, when the fusion in the vertical meridian is restricted to two separated contours. The visual distance was 40 cm. (Reprinted from the Archives of Ophthalmology21, 612 (1939).)

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Schematic diagram showing the equivalent vertical angular disparity of the retinal images of peripherally located contours, caused by the difference in the sizes of the images introduced by a size lens. (Reprinted from the Archives of Ophthalmology21, 613 (1939).)

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Graphical illustration of a set of data (K.N.O.), showing the induced size effect curve determined by a “null” method, that is, by off-setting the apparent rotation of the test plane caused by a vertical image size difference by a horizontal size difference to keep the test plane normal.

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

A graphical illustration of a set of data (K.N.O.) showing the apparent rotation of a test plane caused by using a series of over-all size lenses before the eyes to introduce over-all image size differences. The curve is the resultant of the geometrical and induced size effects.

Fig. 9
Fig. 9

Graphical illustration of a set of data for the induced effect showing marked displacement of the center of symmetry of the sigmoid curve.

Fig. 10
Fig. 10

Graphical illustration of a set of data for the induced effect showing marked displacement of the center of symmetry of the sigmoid curve.

Equations (1)

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tan ϕ = M - 1 M + 1 b a ,