Abstract

The theory and construction of an apparatus which permits the rapid measurement of pupillary diameters is presented. This instrument, the koremetron, is portable, and uses the same principle as that involved in observing entoptical phenomena.

© 1939 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. Helmholtz, Physiological Optics (Optical Society of America, 1924), Vol. 1, p. 204.

Helmholtz,

Helmholtz, Physiological Optics (Optical Society of America, 1924), Vol. 1, p. 204.

Other (1)

Helmholtz, Physiological Optics (Optical Society of America, 1924), Vol. 1, p. 204.

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Figures (4)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

For explanation see text

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

The koremetron with the battery box.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Showing the scale by which is measured the apparent diameter of the disk of light.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Showing what is seen by the eye. The picture was taken by putting the scale at the focus of the lens (p=7.5 cm); the camera was focused upon infinity and placed in front of the eyepiece with a 1 4 -inch stop between the eyepiece and the camera lens.

Equations (9)

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θ 2 tan 1 2 θ = d / ( f - x ) .
θ 2 tan 1 2 θ = s / f .
d = s ( 1 - x / f ) .
θ 2 tan 1 2 θ = d / ( f q / ( q - f ) - x )
d = s ( q / ( q - f ) - x / f ) .
p = f ( F - x ) / ( F + f - x )
θ 2 tan 1 2 θ = s f / F ( f - p ) .
d = s [ f q - x ( q - f ) q - f · f + F - x f F ] .
F = x - f p / ( p - f ) .