Abstract

A sensitometer is described which affords a continuous variation of illumination across the sensitive surface. Two intensity-ranges are available, using the same source of light and the same exposure-time; with both ranges, the instrument can give an over-all variation of intensity in the ratio 2000: 1. No lenses or moving parts are needed, and the sensitometer is strictly neutral with regard to wave-length.

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References

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  1. L. A. Jones, Photographic Sensitometry (Eastman Kodak Company, 1934).
  2. L. Silberstein and J. H. Webb, Phil. Mag. 18, 1 (1934).
  3. W. Kinder, Zeits. f. Instrument. 56, 393 (1936).

Jones, L. A.

L. A. Jones, Photographic Sensitometry (Eastman Kodak Company, 1934).

Kinder, W.

W. Kinder, Zeits. f. Instrument. 56, 393 (1936).

Silberstein, L.

L. Silberstein and J. H. Webb, Phil. Mag. 18, 1 (1934).

Webb, J. H.

L. Silberstein and J. H. Webb, Phil. Mag. 18, 1 (1934).

Other (3)

L. A. Jones, Photographic Sensitometry (Eastman Kodak Company, 1934).

L. Silberstein and J. H. Webb, Phil. Mag. 18, 1 (1934).

W. Kinder, Zeits. f. Instrument. 56, 393 (1936).

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