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References

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  1. Registered trade-name of a material manufactured and sold under (E. H. Land) U. S. Patent1,918,848;U. S. Patent1,989,371;U. S. Patent1,951,664;U. S. Patent1,956,867;U. S. Patent2, 011, 553.
  2. Ingersoll, Winans, and Krause, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 26, 233–4 (1936); Strong, J. Opt Soc. Am. 26, 256 (1936); Tuzi and Nisida, Sci. Pap. Inst. Phys. & Chem. Res. Tokyo 31, 99–107 (1937).
    [Crossref]

1936 (1)

J. Opt. Soc. Am. (1)

Other (1)

Registered trade-name of a material manufactured and sold under (E. H. Land) U. S. Patent1,918,848;U. S. Patent1,989,371;U. S. Patent1,951,664;U. S. Patent1,956,867;U. S. Patent2, 011, 553.

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Figures (7)

F. 1
F. 1

The spectral distribution of transmission of commercial Polaroid (July 1937). The dotted line is the visibility curve, drawn at half-scale.

F. 2
F. 2

The spectral distribution of the degree of polarization of light transmitted by commercial Polaroid (July 1937). The dotted line is the visibility curve.

F. 3
F. 3

Upper part of curve shown in Fig. 2, with the vertical scale greatly enlarged. The shaded area shows the range of variation of the degree of polarization of different samples of Polaroid.

F. 4
F. 4

The calculated transmission of two pieces of Polaroid superposed with their axes parallel. Small circles identify experimentally observed points.

F. 5
F. 5

The calculated transmission of two pieces of Polaroid superposed with their axes crossed. Small circles identify experimentally observed points.

F. 6
F. 6

Vector diagram accompanying the discussion of the photometrical use of Polaroid.

F. 7
F. 7

The dashed curve shows the effective relative transmission (for visual purposes) of two pieces of Polaroid superposed as a function of the angle between their polarizing axes. The solid line represents the ideal condition.

Equations (9)

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V = ( 1 R ) / ( 1 + R ) .
H 1 = K 2 ( 1 + V 2 )
H 2 = K 2 ( 1 V 2 ) .
R = k x / k y , V = ( k y k x ) / ( k y + k x ) , K = 1 2 ( k y + k x ) .
H 1 = 1 2 k y 2 ( 1 + R 2 )
H 2 = k y 2 R .
J = 1 2 I 0 ( k y ( k y cos 2 θ + k x sin 2 θ ) + k x ( k y sin 2 θ + k x cos 2 θ ) ) ,
J = 1 2 I 0 k y 2 ( ( 1 + R 2 ) cos 2 θ + 2 R sin 2 θ ) .
J = 1 2 I 0 k y 2 cos 2 θ .