Abstract

A new design for a stellar spectrograph which embodies lightness in weight with high rigidity is described. The instrument is composed of three parts: the spectrograph proper, the inner case or “rigidity box,” and the constant temperature case. The spectrograph proper is a light weight instrument which may be removed easily from the mounting and used as a laboratory instrument if desired. The “rigidity box” is the member which forms the main support for the spectrograph. The method of mounting is such that the spectrograph proper has a small degree of freedom which minimizes the possibility of small stresses being transmitted to it from mechanical or thermal causes. The constant temperature case is an easily removed cover which provides a second constant temperature air space about the spectrograph and with a triple fan system provides an efficient temperature control for the instrument. The spectrograph is equipped with a slit which eliminates troubles arising from lack of parallelism of the jaws, shifting zero and back-lash. The slit may be opened rapidly to maximum width for intensity calibration without loosing a predetermined slit width. Curves showing the performance of the thermal-control system are given, as well as photographs of the mechanical parts.

© 1936 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. For the description of an earlier spectrograph utilizing these optical parts see S. L. Boothroyd, Astrophys. J. 80, 1 (1934); and R. W. Shaw, Astrophys. J. 82, 87 (1935).
    [Crossref]
  2. J. H. Dowell, Trans. Opt. Soc. 31, 226 (1929–30).
    [Crossref]

1934 (1)

For the description of an earlier spectrograph utilizing these optical parts see S. L. Boothroyd, Astrophys. J. 80, 1 (1934); and R. W. Shaw, Astrophys. J. 82, 87 (1935).
[Crossref]

Boothroyd, S. L.

For the description of an earlier spectrograph utilizing these optical parts see S. L. Boothroyd, Astrophys. J. 80, 1 (1934); and R. W. Shaw, Astrophys. J. 82, 87 (1935).
[Crossref]

Dowell, J. H.

J. H. Dowell, Trans. Opt. Soc. 31, 226 (1929–30).
[Crossref]

Astrophys. J. (1)

For the description of an earlier spectrograph utilizing these optical parts see S. L. Boothroyd, Astrophys. J. 80, 1 (1934); and R. W. Shaw, Astrophys. J. 82, 87 (1935).
[Crossref]

Trans. Opt. Soc. (1)

J. H. Dowell, Trans. Opt. Soc. 31, 226 (1929–30).
[Crossref]

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Figures (6)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Schematic arrangement of the spectrograph proper, the “rigidity box,” and the constant temperature case.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

The assembled spectrograph proper and the master pin with locking nuts.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

The inner case or “rigidity box” with master pin inserted and the slit housing E attached.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

The constant temperature case with front H removed. The sliding strips K hold the case on the master pin.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Spectrograph slit showing the cam used for rapid opening of the slit for intensity calibrations.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Time-temperature curves showing the effectiveness of the thermal insulation with the temperature control inactive and active. In the lower graph note that the observations for B and C lie together on the same horizontal curve indicating complete temperature regulation throughout the night.