Abstract

Estimation of chromaticity differences has been facilitated by the preparation of a standard mixture diagram showing by a group of ellipses the scales of perceptibility at the various parts of the diagram. The distances from the boundaries of the ellipses to their respective “centers” all correspond approximately to the same number (100) of “least perceptible differences.” The estimation of nearest color temperature has been facilitated by the preparation of a mixture diagram on which is shown a family of straight lines intersecting the Planckian locus; each straight line corresponds approximately to the locus of points representing stimuli of chromaticity more closely resembling that of the Planckian radiator at the intersection than that of any other Planckian radiator.

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  1. D. B. Judd, "The 1931 I.C.I. Standard Observer and Coordinate System for Colorimetry," J. Opt. Soc. Am. 23, 359 (1933).
  2. D. B. Judd, "A Maxwell Triangle Yielding Uniform Chromaticity Scales," Nat. Bur. Stand. J. Research 14, 41 (1935) RP756; also J. Opt. Soc. Am. 25, 24 (1935).
  3. See, for example, D. B. Judd, "A Method for Determining Whiteness of Paper," Paper Trade Journal, 100, No. 21, TS40 (1935); also Tech. Assoc. Papers, Series XVIII, 392 (1935); and D. B. Judd, "A Method for Determining Whiteness of Paper, II," Tech. Assoc. Papers, Series XIX, 359 (1936); also Paper Trade Journal 103, No. 8, TS38 (1936).
  4. For these terms and concepts, see R. Davis, "A Correlated Color Temperature for Illuminants," Nat. Bur. Stand. J. Research 7, 659 (1931); RP365.
  5. Association of American Railroads, Signal Section Specification 69–35, Signal glasses (exclusive of hand lantern globes). Manual of Signal Section, AAR, Part 136 (1935).
  6. H. J. McNicholas, "Color and Spectral Transmittance of Vegetable Oils," Nat. Bur. Stand. J. Research 15, 99 (1935); RP 815; also Oil & Soap 12, 167 (1935); see his Fig. 8.
  7. Fig. 2 is a reproduction of a figure previously used (see reference 1). Since that time a new color temperature scale has been adopted (see reference 9) and coincidentally the value of C2 used was changed from 14,350 to 14,320 micron degrees to conform with the International Temperature Scale. This change in C2 makes only 0.2 percent change in the temperature (or reciprocal temperature) and is too small to be shown in Fig. 2. For this reason the old diagram has been used. In Fig. 3, however, the change (about 0.8 µrd) could be easily seen. In Table II, the values of color temperature listed were taken from Davis' paper in which the older value of 14,350 was used for C2.
  8. I. G. Priest, "A Proposed Scale for Use in Specifying the Chromaticity of Incandescent Illuminants and Various Phases of Daylight," J. Opt. Soc. Am. 23, 41 (1933).
  9. H. T. Wensel, D. B. Judd and Wm. F. Roester, "Establishment of a Scale of Color Temperature," Nat. Bur. Stand. J. Research 12, 527 (1934); RP677.

1935 (2)

D. B. Judd, "A Maxwell Triangle Yielding Uniform Chromaticity Scales," Nat. Bur. Stand. J. Research 14, 41 (1935) RP756; also J. Opt. Soc. Am. 25, 24 (1935).

H. J. McNicholas, "Color and Spectral Transmittance of Vegetable Oils," Nat. Bur. Stand. J. Research 15, 99 (1935); RP 815; also Oil & Soap 12, 167 (1935); see his Fig. 8.

1934 (1)

H. T. Wensel, D. B. Judd and Wm. F. Roester, "Establishment of a Scale of Color Temperature," Nat. Bur. Stand. J. Research 12, 527 (1934); RP677.

1933 (2)

1931 (1)

For these terms and concepts, see R. Davis, "A Correlated Color Temperature for Illuminants," Nat. Bur. Stand. J. Research 7, 659 (1931); RP365.

Davis, R.

For these terms and concepts, see R. Davis, "A Correlated Color Temperature for Illuminants," Nat. Bur. Stand. J. Research 7, 659 (1931); RP365.

Judd, D. B.

D. B. Judd, "A Maxwell Triangle Yielding Uniform Chromaticity Scales," Nat. Bur. Stand. J. Research 14, 41 (1935) RP756; also J. Opt. Soc. Am. 25, 24 (1935).

H. T. Wensel, D. B. Judd and Wm. F. Roester, "Establishment of a Scale of Color Temperature," Nat. Bur. Stand. J. Research 12, 527 (1934); RP677.

D. B. Judd, "The 1931 I.C.I. Standard Observer and Coordinate System for Colorimetry," J. Opt. Soc. Am. 23, 359 (1933).

See, for example, D. B. Judd, "A Method for Determining Whiteness of Paper," Paper Trade Journal, 100, No. 21, TS40 (1935); also Tech. Assoc. Papers, Series XVIII, 392 (1935); and D. B. Judd, "A Method for Determining Whiteness of Paper, II," Tech. Assoc. Papers, Series XIX, 359 (1936); also Paper Trade Journal 103, No. 8, TS38 (1936).

McNicholas, H. J.

H. J. McNicholas, "Color and Spectral Transmittance of Vegetable Oils," Nat. Bur. Stand. J. Research 15, 99 (1935); RP 815; also Oil & Soap 12, 167 (1935); see his Fig. 8.

Priest, I. G.

Roester, Wm. F.

H. T. Wensel, D. B. Judd and Wm. F. Roester, "Establishment of a Scale of Color Temperature," Nat. Bur. Stand. J. Research 12, 527 (1934); RP677.

Wensel, H. T.

H. T. Wensel, D. B. Judd and Wm. F. Roester, "Establishment of a Scale of Color Temperature," Nat. Bur. Stand. J. Research 12, 527 (1934); RP677.

J. Opt. Soc. Am. (2)

Nat. Bur. Stand. J. Research (4)

H. T. Wensel, D. B. Judd and Wm. F. Roester, "Establishment of a Scale of Color Temperature," Nat. Bur. Stand. J. Research 12, 527 (1934); RP677.

H. J. McNicholas, "Color and Spectral Transmittance of Vegetable Oils," Nat. Bur. Stand. J. Research 15, 99 (1935); RP 815; also Oil & Soap 12, 167 (1935); see his Fig. 8.

D. B. Judd, "A Maxwell Triangle Yielding Uniform Chromaticity Scales," Nat. Bur. Stand. J. Research 14, 41 (1935) RP756; also J. Opt. Soc. Am. 25, 24 (1935).

For these terms and concepts, see R. Davis, "A Correlated Color Temperature for Illuminants," Nat. Bur. Stand. J. Research 7, 659 (1931); RP365.

Other (3)

Association of American Railroads, Signal Section Specification 69–35, Signal glasses (exclusive of hand lantern globes). Manual of Signal Section, AAR, Part 136 (1935).

See, for example, D. B. Judd, "A Method for Determining Whiteness of Paper," Paper Trade Journal, 100, No. 21, TS40 (1935); also Tech. Assoc. Papers, Series XVIII, 392 (1935); and D. B. Judd, "A Method for Determining Whiteness of Paper, II," Tech. Assoc. Papers, Series XIX, 359 (1936); also Paper Trade Journal 103, No. 8, TS38 (1936).

Fig. 2 is a reproduction of a figure previously used (see reference 1). Since that time a new color temperature scale has been adopted (see reference 9) and coincidentally the value of C2 used was changed from 14,350 to 14,320 micron degrees to conform with the International Temperature Scale. This change in C2 makes only 0.2 percent change in the temperature (or reciprocal temperature) and is too small to be shown in Fig. 2. For this reason the old diagram has been used. In Fig. 3, however, the change (about 0.8 µrd) could be easily seen. In Table II, the values of color temperature listed were taken from Davis' paper in which the older value of 14,350 was used for C2.

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