Abstract

Discussions of the Michelson interferometer indicate that fringes are formed by the superposition of two approximately parallel wave fronts. Wave fronts having the necessary characteristics can be obtained by mounting gratings on the arms of the interferometer in the places of the customary reflecting mirrors. The construction and action of such an interferometer has been studied; it is here described. The instrument becomes its own monochromator when the gratings are rotated to positions of minimum deviation for some particular wave-length. The customary form of the Michelson interferometer may be considered as the special case of the grating interferometer for which the grating space is large in comparison with λ.

© 1934 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. The symbols in this equation have the significance specified for them in W. L. Taylor, College Manual of Optics, Ginn and Company (1924), p. 55.
  2. W. E. Williams, Applications of Interferometry, E. P. Dutton and Company (1930), p. 71.
  3. W. E. Williams, Studies in Interferometry—II, Proc. Phys. Soc. 45, Part 5, 699 (1933).
    [CrossRef]

1933 (1)

W. E. Williams, Studies in Interferometry—II, Proc. Phys. Soc. 45, Part 5, 699 (1933).
[CrossRef]

Taylor, W. L.

The symbols in this equation have the significance specified for them in W. L. Taylor, College Manual of Optics, Ginn and Company (1924), p. 55.

Williams, W. E.

W. E. Williams, Studies in Interferometry—II, Proc. Phys. Soc. 45, Part 5, 699 (1933).
[CrossRef]

W. E. Williams, Applications of Interferometry, E. P. Dutton and Company (1930), p. 71.

Proc. Phys. Soc. (1)

W. E. Williams, Studies in Interferometry—II, Proc. Phys. Soc. 45, Part 5, 699 (1933).
[CrossRef]

Other (2)

The symbols in this equation have the significance specified for them in W. L. Taylor, College Manual of Optics, Ginn and Company (1924), p. 55.

W. E. Williams, Applications of Interferometry, E. P. Dutton and Company (1930), p. 71.

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Figures (4)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Assembly drawing of ideal mounting. AA, fixed axis; BB, axis of turntable; AC, axis of reflection; DD, axis of diffraction; 1, screw ring; 2, collar and cylindrical shell; 3, bracket; 4, screw release for rotation about fixed axis; 5, screw for slow motion about axis of diffraction; 6, screw release for gross motion about axis of reflection; 7, screw for slow motion about axis of reflection; 8, U-shaped standard; 9, clamp for grating; 10, screw for slow motion about turntable axis; 11, lever release for gross motion about turntable axis.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

A grating interferometer. One grating is provided with an ideal mounting, the other with a spectrometer mounting. The grating has been removed from the ideal mounting to show the details of construction.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Scheme for superposing two beams of wave-length λ with gratings set for complementary orders.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Scheme for superposing two beams of wave-length λ with gratings set for chromatic orders.

Equations (7)

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sin i = m λ - sin i ,
sin i = - sin i .
A 2 = A 1 2 + A 2 2 + 2 A 1 A 2 cos γ .
A 1 = ( a 1 c 1 ) sin π a 1 θ 1 π a 1 θ 1 · sin N 1 π σ 1 θ 1 sin π σ 1 θ 1
sin ( i + i ) 2 = m λ 2 σ sec ( i - i ) 2 .
sin i = m λ / 2 σ .
sin i = m ( λ + Δ λ ) / σ - sin i .