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  1. For a general account of the methods and apparatus of television see “Symposium on Television”, Bell System Technical Journal, pp. 551–652; October, 1927.
  2. “The Use of a Moving Beam of Light to Scan a Scene for Television,” F. Gray, J. O. S. A. & R. S. I., p. 177; March, 1928.
    [Crossref]
  3. The sending end apparatus is so little altered that recent demonstrations of monochrome television in the Bell Laboratories’ auditorium have used one channel of the partly developed three-color apparatus. This has usually been the “green,” which gives approximately ortho-chromatic effects.
  4. See “The Transformation of Color Mixture Equations, etc.,” Ives, Journal Franklin Institute, p. 34; January, 1923.
  5. A method of sending the direct current component on a low frequency carrier over a separate channel of relatively low quality has been devised by R. C. Mathes (U. S. patent1,671,302, May29, 1928). By the use of three such channels the proper values for the general color of the field could be automatically established.

1928 (1)

“The Use of a Moving Beam of Light to Scan a Scene for Television,” F. Gray, J. O. S. A. & R. S. I., p. 177; March, 1928.
[Crossref]

1927 (1)

For a general account of the methods and apparatus of television see “Symposium on Television”, Bell System Technical Journal, pp. 551–652; October, 1927.

1923 (1)

See “The Transformation of Color Mixture Equations, etc.,” Ives, Journal Franklin Institute, p. 34; January, 1923.

Gray, F.

“The Use of a Moving Beam of Light to Scan a Scene for Television,” F. Gray, J. O. S. A. & R. S. I., p. 177; March, 1928.
[Crossref]

Ives,

See “The Transformation of Color Mixture Equations, etc.,” Ives, Journal Franklin Institute, p. 34; January, 1923.

Mathes, R. C.

A method of sending the direct current component on a low frequency carrier over a separate channel of relatively low quality has been devised by R. C. Mathes (U. S. patent1,671,302, May29, 1928). By the use of three such channels the proper values for the general color of the field could be automatically established.

Bell System Technical Journal (1)

For a general account of the methods and apparatus of television see “Symposium on Television”, Bell System Technical Journal, pp. 551–652; October, 1927.

J. O. S. A. & R. S. I. (1)

“The Use of a Moving Beam of Light to Scan a Scene for Television,” F. Gray, J. O. S. A. & R. S. I., p. 177; March, 1928.
[Crossref]

Journal Franklin Institute (1)

See “The Transformation of Color Mixture Equations, etc.,” Ives, Journal Franklin Institute, p. 34; January, 1923.

Other (2)

A method of sending the direct current component on a low frequency carrier over a separate channel of relatively low quality has been devised by R. C. Mathes (U. S. patent1,671,302, May29, 1928). By the use of three such channels the proper values for the general color of the field could be automatically established.

The sending end apparatus is so little altered that recent demonstrations of monochrome television in the Bell Laboratories’ auditorium have used one channel of the partly developed three-color apparatus. This has usually been the “green,” which gives approximately ortho-chromatic effects.

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Figures (11)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Characteristics of potassium hydride, and of special color sensitive sodium cells used for television in color.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Mixture curves of three primary colors used (full lines) and, (dashed lines) response curves of photoelectric cells with their associated filters.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Arrangement of photoelectric cells for three-color television.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Photoelectric cell case, showing one color filter partly removed to expose a photoelectric cell.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Photoelectric cell cabinet from the front, showing diffusing glasses to equalize illumination of cells.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Side view of sending end apparatus, with doors of cabinets open.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Triple cascade amplifier for handling the red, green and blue signals.

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

Water-cooled glow lamp.

Fig. 9
Fig. 9

Arrangement of lamps, color filters and mirrors at receiving end.

Fig. 10
Fig. 10

Side view of receiving end apparatus.

Fig. 11
Fig. 11

Receiving apparatus for television in colors. At left, synchronizing control; at center, disc cabinet, showing viewing aperture at top center; to right, amplifier for red, green and blue signals.