Abstract

A direct-current amplifier consisting essentially of a Wheatstone bridge, having the amplifying tube in one arm and a balancing tube in another, has been described by P. I. Wold and by C. E. Wynn-Williams. This circuit has now been developed to give a constant amplification for currents in either direction up to 10,000 times the lowest measurable value. The amplification and the lowest measurable current are alterable together by changing the resistance introduced between the grid and filament of the amplifying tube. With tubes of high insulation, the amplification can be made as large as 106; and the measurable current as low as 10−14 ampere. Some improvements of the circuit are: (1) the insertion of a resistance in series with the tube in one arm of the bridge to “compensate” for variations in plate and grid battery voltages; (2) the suspension of the tubes to protect them from mechanical vibrations; (3) the use of tubes with pure tungsten filaments to avoid changes in contact potentials, and with plates enclosing the filaments completely to lower the effects of wall charges. In a “null” method of using the circuit the values of the grid resistance and an auxiliary potential introduced in the grid-filament circuit are sufficient to determine the measured current.

© 1929 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article
OSA Recommended Articles
A Bridge Grid Resistor Amplifier

Joseph Razek and Peter J. Mulder
J. Opt. Soc. Am. 19(6) 390-403 (1929)

Instrument Section Thermionic Vacuum Tubes and their Applications1

Robert W. King
J. Opt. Soc. Am. 8(1) 77-147 (1924)

An Electron Tube Amplifier for Amplifying Direct Current

H. A. Snow
J. Opt. Soc. Am. 6(2) 186-192 (1922)

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Figures (3)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Tables (1)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article tables are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Equations (3)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Equations are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription