Abstract

This paper describes a new piece of apparatus for obtaining an accurate table of time and distance of a freely falling body; by the use of counterweights, the device serves as an accurate Atwood machine to check Newton’s Second Law of Motion.

© 1928 Optical Society of America

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Figures (7)

F. 1
F. 1

Perspective and detail of the apparatus.

F. 2
F. 2

Free fall record and table. Actual dia. 6 5 8 .

F. 3
F. 3

Records 1 and 2 plotted on log log paper.

F. 4
F. 4

Record using counterweight; accurate Atwood machine.

Equations (11)

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s = υ 0 t + 1 2 a t 2 = 0.4 foot υ 0 = 2 a h a = M M + m g = 31.6 M g = W }
The elastic energy stored in the cord is 1 / 2 eMgl ,
m A = 1 2 eMg A = 1 2 e M m g
x = l , T = M g , t = 0 s = 0 , T = M g , t = 0 x = 0 , T = 0 , t = t 1 s = s 1 , T = 0 , t = t 1
m d 2 x d t 2 + T = 0 T = M g x l
x = l cos B t B = M g m l υ = l B sin B t
x = 0 t = t 1 = π 2 1 B
t = .002 seconds .
T m g = m d 2 x d t 2
0 l ( T m g ) d x = m 0 υ d 2 x d t 2 d x d t d t = m υ 2 2
T ( average ) = m l g H + m g