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Figures (5)

F. 1
F. 1

Globe representing the rotating Earth. The small triangular piece above the slot represents the Foucault pendulum. This can be set at any latitude. Its rate of rotation relative to that of the globe reproduces exactly that of the Foucault pendulum at that latitude.

F. 2
F. 2

Photograph of Foucault pendulum swinging in the rotunda of the building of the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D. C., with small model and miniature pendulum at its side illustrating the principle of the Foucault pendulum.

F. 3
F. 3

In this diagram A represents a point on the surface of the rotating Earth; DC, the axis of rotation. In a short period of time the point A travels to B and its North-South line shifts thereby from AD to BD. The angle ADB is the angle swept through by the Foucault pendulum in this time period; this angle bears a definite relation to the angle AOB or ECF, the angle swept through by the rotating Earth during this period.

F. 4
F. 4

Photograph of driving mechanism of model illustrating the action of the Foucault pendulum.

F. 5
F. 5

Diagrammatic sketch showing hemispherical cam, metal disk rolling over cam, and gears transmitting motion of disk to Foucault pendulum model. In this sketch the Foucault pendulum is supposed to be at the North Pole.