Abstract

By means of a quartz mercury lamp, a thermocouple and absorbing screens, the diffuse reflectivities in the region λ0.3 to 7μ were measured for snow, sand, crushed quartz, plaster paris, white paper, white cotton cloth, sodium carbonate and sodium chloride. The ultraviolet reflectivity of snow was relatively high, being two to four times that of sand. This gives a physical basis for the current idea that ultraviolet glare may be an important factor in snow blindness.

© 1928 Optical Society of America

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