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  1. U. S. Patent 725, 567; 1903.
  2. U. S. Patent 1, 260, 682; 1918. See also, G. Bessière, Comptes Rendus, 182, p. 208; 1926.
  3. Kanolt and Bessière describe forens of cameras (loc. cit.). Kanolt moves the sensitive plate with respect to the grating, with which it is in contact, while the whole camera pivots around the object. Bessière moves the lens, which is provided with a reversing prism, from the the normal to one edge of the plate, across the plate, moving the whole camera as well to increase its range. Bessière's arrangement is fundamentally bettered if a roof prism is used instead of a reversing prism since the lens can then be moved equally far to either side of the normal and the picture is obtained unreversed. Neither of the cameras is in my opinion as elegant or flexible as the one here described.

Bessière, G.

U. S. Patent 1, 260, 682; 1918. See also, G. Bessière, Comptes Rendus, 182, p. 208; 1926.

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U. S. Patent 725, 567; 1903.

U. S. Patent 1, 260, 682; 1918. See also, G. Bessière, Comptes Rendus, 182, p. 208; 1926.

Kanolt and Bessière describe forens of cameras (loc. cit.). Kanolt moves the sensitive plate with respect to the grating, with which it is in contact, while the whole camera pivots around the object. Bessière moves the lens, which is provided with a reversing prism, from the the normal to one edge of the plate, across the plate, moving the whole camera as well to increase its range. Bessière's arrangement is fundamentally bettered if a roof prism is used instead of a reversing prism since the lens can then be moved equally far to either side of the normal and the picture is obtained unreversed. Neither of the cameras is in my opinion as elegant or flexible as the one here described.

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