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  1. The only sensitometric study I have found is in what was apparently intended to be a series of articles describing “Experiments on the Halftone Process” by A. J. Bull, W. J. Smith, and E. L. Turner, in “The Photographic Journal,”  41, p. 8; 1917.The results obtained by these investigators are in general agreement with those here presented, although their direction of approach to the problem is quite different.
  2. “Some Photographic Problems Encountered in the Transmission of Pictures by Electricity,” Ives, J.O.S.A. & R.S.I., March, 1926.
    [Crossref]
  3. See L. A. Jones, “Photographic Reproduction of Tone,” J.O.S.A. & R.S.I.,  5, p. 3; p. 232, 1921.
    [Crossref]
  4. Before the introduction of panchromatic “process” dry plates the structured negatives for three-color work had to be made by the wet plate process. This involved making first a set of color selection negatives on panchromatic dry plates. But it appears that the common procedure was to make the dot negatives from photographic positives, printed from the selection negatives, whereas, according to the results here presented, making the screened exposure on the negatives would have been preferable. The number of photographic copyings would have been the same.)

1926 (1)

“Some Photographic Problems Encountered in the Transmission of Pictures by Electricity,” Ives, J.O.S.A. & R.S.I., March, 1926.
[Crossref]

1921 (1)

See L. A. Jones, “Photographic Reproduction of Tone,” J.O.S.A. & R.S.I.,  5, p. 3; p. 232, 1921.
[Crossref]

1917 (1)

The only sensitometric study I have found is in what was apparently intended to be a series of articles describing “Experiments on the Halftone Process” by A. J. Bull, W. J. Smith, and E. L. Turner, in “The Photographic Journal,”  41, p. 8; 1917.The results obtained by these investigators are in general agreement with those here presented, although their direction of approach to the problem is quite different.

Bull, A. J.

The only sensitometric study I have found is in what was apparently intended to be a series of articles describing “Experiments on the Halftone Process” by A. J. Bull, W. J. Smith, and E. L. Turner, in “The Photographic Journal,”  41, p. 8; 1917.The results obtained by these investigators are in general agreement with those here presented, although their direction of approach to the problem is quite different.

Ives,

“Some Photographic Problems Encountered in the Transmission of Pictures by Electricity,” Ives, J.O.S.A. & R.S.I., March, 1926.
[Crossref]

Jones, L. A.

See L. A. Jones, “Photographic Reproduction of Tone,” J.O.S.A. & R.S.I.,  5, p. 3; p. 232, 1921.
[Crossref]

Smith, W. J.

The only sensitometric study I have found is in what was apparently intended to be a series of articles describing “Experiments on the Halftone Process” by A. J. Bull, W. J. Smith, and E. L. Turner, in “The Photographic Journal,”  41, p. 8; 1917.The results obtained by these investigators are in general agreement with those here presented, although their direction of approach to the problem is quite different.

Turner, E. L.

The only sensitometric study I have found is in what was apparently intended to be a series of articles describing “Experiments on the Halftone Process” by A. J. Bull, W. J. Smith, and E. L. Turner, in “The Photographic Journal,”  41, p. 8; 1917.The results obtained by these investigators are in general agreement with those here presented, although their direction of approach to the problem is quite different.

J.O.S.A. & R.S.I. (2)

“Some Photographic Problems Encountered in the Transmission of Pictures by Electricity,” Ives, J.O.S.A. & R.S.I., March, 1926.
[Crossref]

See L. A. Jones, “Photographic Reproduction of Tone,” J.O.S.A. & R.S.I.,  5, p. 3; p. 232, 1921.
[Crossref]

The Photographic Journal (1)

The only sensitometric study I have found is in what was apparently intended to be a series of articles describing “Experiments on the Halftone Process” by A. J. Bull, W. J. Smith, and E. L. Turner, in “The Photographic Journal,”  41, p. 8; 1917.The results obtained by these investigators are in general agreement with those here presented, although their direction of approach to the problem is quite different.

Other (1)

Before the introduction of panchromatic “process” dry plates the structured negatives for three-color work had to be made by the wet plate process. This involved making first a set of color selection negatives on panchromatic dry plates. But it appears that the common procedure was to make the dot negatives from photographic positives, printed from the selection negatives, whereas, according to the results here presented, making the screened exposure on the negatives would have been preferable. The number of photographic copyings would have been the same.)

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Figures (9)

F. 1
F. 1

Negative characteristics for various developments, plotted on linear scale.

F. 2
F. 2

Conditions for correct tone rendering, plotted on linear scale.

F. 3
F. 3

Ideal characteristic of structured negative (dashed line); linear scale.

F. 4
F. 4

Ideal characteristic of structured negative, logarithmic scale.

F. 5
F. 5

Actual halftone negative characteristic, on linear plot. Dashed line shows characteristic of print from this negative.

F. 6
F. 6

Actual halftone negative characteristic, logarithmic plot.

F. 7
F. 7

Characteristic of collodion dry plate. A, without screen; B, through screen, with large lens diaphragm; C, through screen, with small lens diaphragm; D, characteristic obtained by “flashing” with a small diaphragm.

F. 8
F. 8

Result of successive exposures with two sizes of diaphragms, and a flash exposure.

F. 9
F. 9

Illustrating method for correct tone reproduction in structured pictures, by making a variable density negative as the first step.

Equations (1)

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D = a + b log E