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  1. J.O.S.A. & R.S.I., 9, pp. 503–520; Nov. 1924. It will be necessary for the reader to refer to this paper in order to understand what follows.
  2. That is, colors having actual dominant wave lengths occurring in the visible spectrum; or more specifically, colors which can be evoked by a suitable mixture of a homogeneous stimulus and the normal neutral heterogeneous stimulus ("white light"). "Spectrum colors" will be understood as spectral colors of unit purity.
  3. Formula 21, J.O.S.A. & R.S.I., 9, p. 510.
  4. J. F. I., p. 38–39, Jan. 1923, and elsewhere. Dr. Ives has informed me in a letter of August 4, 1925 that he believes he has followed consistently in all of his papers the definition and practice ascribed to him in the present paper.
  5. The basis for this convention is the theoretical idea of operating only on the original neutral field to match the sample in all cases. This, of course, is actually impossible in matching non-spectral colors. To conserve the idea we may think of subtracting the homogeneous stimulus from the neutral field instead of adding it (as in actual practice) to the sample field.
  6. Report O. S. A. Colorim. Com., J.O.S.A. & R.S.I., 6, pp. 527–596; 1922. The definition is not given explicitly in the report but is implicit in Fig. 9, p. 575 and Tab. 14 B, p. 585. For the explicit statement of the definition of purity as used in this report, I am indebted to Troland's colleague, Mr. E. A. Weaver. (Letter of Aug. 5, 1925, Weaver to Priest.)
  7. Fig. 1, J.O.S.A. & R.S.I., 9, p. 507.
  8. If two of the elementary stimuli correspond to the "ends of the spectrum," g is, in general, the least of the three coordinates for non-spectral colors. This is true for the elementaries chosen by the O. S. A. Colorimetry Committee. However, since this choice is not necessary, we shall consider also the cases of c = r and c = b in what follows.
  9. J.O.S.A. & R.S.I., 9, p. 510.
  10. J.O.S.A. & R.S.I., 9, p. 511.

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J.O.S.A. & R.S.I., 9, pp. 503–520; Nov. 1924. It will be necessary for the reader to refer to this paper in order to understand what follows.

That is, colors having actual dominant wave lengths occurring in the visible spectrum; or more specifically, colors which can be evoked by a suitable mixture of a homogeneous stimulus and the normal neutral heterogeneous stimulus ("white light"). "Spectrum colors" will be understood as spectral colors of unit purity.

Formula 21, J.O.S.A. & R.S.I., 9, p. 510.

J. F. I., p. 38–39, Jan. 1923, and elsewhere. Dr. Ives has informed me in a letter of August 4, 1925 that he believes he has followed consistently in all of his papers the definition and practice ascribed to him in the present paper.

The basis for this convention is the theoretical idea of operating only on the original neutral field to match the sample in all cases. This, of course, is actually impossible in matching non-spectral colors. To conserve the idea we may think of subtracting the homogeneous stimulus from the neutral field instead of adding it (as in actual practice) to the sample field.

Report O. S. A. Colorim. Com., J.O.S.A. & R.S.I., 6, pp. 527–596; 1922. The definition is not given explicitly in the report but is implicit in Fig. 9, p. 575 and Tab. 14 B, p. 585. For the explicit statement of the definition of purity as used in this report, I am indebted to Troland's colleague, Mr. E. A. Weaver. (Letter of Aug. 5, 1925, Weaver to Priest.)

Fig. 1, J.O.S.A. & R.S.I., 9, p. 507.

If two of the elementary stimuli correspond to the "ends of the spectrum," g is, in general, the least of the three coordinates for non-spectral colors. This is true for the elementaries chosen by the O. S. A. Colorimetry Committee. However, since this choice is not necessary, we shall consider also the cases of c = r and c = b in what follows.

J.O.S.A. & R.S.I., 9, p. 510.

J.O.S.A. & R.S.I., 9, p. 511.

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