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  1. Zeitschr. f. Inst. 19, p. 97, 1899.
  2. Ann. de Phys. (4)  39, p. 705, 1912.
  3. J. de Phys. (5)  9, p. 37, 1919.
  4. Bull. Bureau of Standards,  9, p. 475, 1913.
    [Crossref]
  5. Bull. Bur. of Stand. 12, p. 483, 1915.
  6. It is readily possible, often advisable and sometimes the practise of spectroscopists, to use more than 10 degrees of opacity in estimating intensities of spectral lines. The average spectrogram perhaps does not give a density of more than 2 for the strongest line on the plate, and this suggests that the upper limit of the scale of estimated intensities might conveniently be extended to 20, or even to 200. Then a larger number of steps would be available in a finer discrimination of opacities, and if the estimates follow Fechner’s law, the factor 10 or 100 will readily permit a rough, but often sufficiently precise, transformation from visually estimated intensities to photographic densities.
  7. Hurter and Driffield: Jour. Soc. Client. Ind., May, 1890, p. 455.
  8. Absorption and diffusion of light in the developed photographic plate have been studied by Callier, who also presents some of the photographic consequences of the scattering of light.Zeitschr. f. Wiss. Phot. 7, p. 257, 1909.

1919 (1)

J. de Phys. (5)  9, p. 37, 1919.

1915 (1)

Bull. Bur. of Stand. 12, p. 483, 1915.

1913 (1)

Bull. Bureau of Standards,  9, p. 475, 1913.
[Crossref]

1912 (1)

Ann. de Phys. (4)  39, p. 705, 1912.

1909 (1)

Absorption and diffusion of light in the developed photographic plate have been studied by Callier, who also presents some of the photographic consequences of the scattering of light.Zeitschr. f. Wiss. Phot. 7, p. 257, 1909.

1899 (1)

Zeitschr. f. Inst. 19, p. 97, 1899.

1890 (1)

Hurter and Driffield: Jour. Soc. Client. Ind., May, 1890, p. 455.

Driffield,

Hurter and Driffield: Jour. Soc. Client. Ind., May, 1890, p. 455.

Hurter,

Hurter and Driffield: Jour. Soc. Client. Ind., May, 1890, p. 455.

Ann. de Phys. (1)

Ann. de Phys. (4)  39, p. 705, 1912.

Bull. Bur. of Stand. (1)

Bull. Bur. of Stand. 12, p. 483, 1915.

Bull. Bureau of Standards (1)

Bull. Bureau of Standards,  9, p. 475, 1913.
[Crossref]

J. de Phys. (1)

J. de Phys. (5)  9, p. 37, 1919.

Jour. Soc. Client. Ind. (1)

Hurter and Driffield: Jour. Soc. Client. Ind., May, 1890, p. 455.

Zeitschr. f. Inst. (1)

Zeitschr. f. Inst. 19, p. 97, 1899.

Zeitschr. f. Wiss. Phot. (1)

Absorption and diffusion of light in the developed photographic plate have been studied by Callier, who also presents some of the photographic consequences of the scattering of light.Zeitschr. f. Wiss. Phot. 7, p. 257, 1909.

Other (1)

It is readily possible, often advisable and sometimes the practise of spectroscopists, to use more than 10 degrees of opacity in estimating intensities of spectral lines. The average spectrogram perhaps does not give a density of more than 2 for the strongest line on the plate, and this suggests that the upper limit of the scale of estimated intensities might conveniently be extended to 20, or even to 200. Then a larger number of steps would be available in a finer discrimination of opacities, and if the estimates follow Fechner’s law, the factor 10 or 100 will readily permit a rough, but often sufficiently precise, transformation from visually estimated intensities to photographic densities.

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Figures (6)

F. 1
F. 1

Microphotometer.

F. 2
F. 2

Calibration curve of microphotometer.

F. 3
F. 3

Photographic density of the cæsium line 8521 A.

F. 4
F. 4

Sensitivity of a Seed 23 plate stained with dicyanin.

F. 5
F. 5

Sensitivity of dicyanin stained plate to equal energy spectrum.

F. 6
F. 6

Microphotometer vs. polarization photometer readings.

Tables (1)

Tables Icon

Table I Wave Lengths, Photographic Densities, and Estimated Intensities in Cæsium Arc Spectrum.

Equations (2)

Equations on this page are rendered with MathJax. Learn more.

D = log O = log I / T
D = c 2 log e λ ( 1 θ 1 1 θ 2 ) = 9590 ( 1 θ 1 1 θ 2 )