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  1. Presented before the Optical Society of America at the New York meeting, held December 28, 1916.
  2. Described in part in American Journal of Science (4) 29, 407–414, 1910; also in “The Methods of Petrographic Microscope Research,” Carnegie Institution of Washington, Publication 158, 1911. New research model constructed by Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. of Rochester, N. Y. Later improvements are described in J. Wash. Acad. Sci. 6, 465–471, 1916.

1910 (1)

Described in part in American Journal of Science (4) 29, 407–414, 1910; also in “The Methods of Petrographic Microscope Research,” Carnegie Institution of Washington, Publication 158, 1911. New research model constructed by Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. of Rochester, N. Y. Later improvements are described in J. Wash. Acad. Sci. 6, 465–471, 1916.

American Journal of Science (4) (1)

Described in part in American Journal of Science (4) 29, 407–414, 1910; also in “The Methods of Petrographic Microscope Research,” Carnegie Institution of Washington, Publication 158, 1911. New research model constructed by Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. of Rochester, N. Y. Later improvements are described in J. Wash. Acad. Sci. 6, 465–471, 1916.

Other (1)

Presented before the Optical Society of America at the New York meeting, held December 28, 1916.

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Figures (1)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Research model Petrographic Microscope constructed by Bausch & Lomb Optical Company, Rochester, N. Y. Distinctive features of this microscope are: large Ahrens polarizing prism; sensitive tint plate mounted in a sliding carriage revolvable about the axis; aplanatic condenser Na = 1.4; substage apertometer; rigid bar connection for simultaneous rotation of nicols; sliding adjustable mount for two objectives, so adjusted that if one objective is in focus and centered, the second on insertion is also centered and focused; combination wedge; negative and positive lenses below and above the polarizer for the correction of astigmatism; swingout lens above Bertrand lens to insure imaging of object plane in plane of iris diaphragm in draw-tube; universal eyepiece with tenth millimeter co-ordinate scale, graduated quartz compensator, and biquartz wedge plate; small prism mounted in slider below eyepiece for observation of interference figures by the Lasaulx method; sliding diaphragm with eyepiece for observation of interference figures of small mineral grains.