Abstract

A photoelectric means for recording an extended spectral region as a function of time has been developed. With this method, the recording procedure imposes no limitations on the time resolution other than that defined by the minimum detectable energy. The optical portion of the device, which includes the time-resolving mechanism, is very similar to a conventional photographic time-resolving spectrograph. However, the photographic plate has been replaced by a television camera which is used in much the same way. In fact, direct analogies can be drawn between the photographic plate and the storage surface of the television camera tube and also between the photographic developer and the scanning electron beam in the camera tube. The method is capable of sensitivities of the order of 103 times those available with Tri-X film in the visible. In addition, the usual cumbersome photographic calibration procedures are avoided since intensities are recorded as vertical deflections, yielding records similar in appearance to those obtained from strip chart recorders.

© 1958 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. B. W. Bullock and S. Silverman, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 40, 608–615 (1950).
    [CrossRef]
  2. Dieke, Dimock, and Crosswhite, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 46, 456–462, (1956).
    [CrossRef]
  3. Crosswhite, Steinhaus, and Dieke, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 41, 299–302 (1951).
    [CrossRef]
  4. Steinhaus, Crosswhite, and Dieke, “Short period investigations in spark discharges,” Department of Physics report, The Johns Hopkins University (June, 1952).
  5. Fastie, Crosswhite, and Gloersen, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 48, 106–111 (1958).
    [CrossRef]

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Figures (4)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Block diagram of the electronic recording, time-resolving spectrometer.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Circuit diagram of the electronic shutter.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Comparison of sensitivities of the Vidicon camera and Kodak Tri-X film. (a) Time-resolved spectrogram of a GE FT106 xenon flash tube on Kodak Tri-X film, doubly developed (f/4 spectrometer). Wavelength increases toward the right; time increases downward. The xenon lines lie around 4700 A. (b) Microdensitometer trace of (a) at around 1 2 of the total lapsed time. (c) Vidicon camera record taken under identical conditions as (a). (d) Vidicon camera record; taken at twice the dispersion as (c).

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Vidicon records of spectra from behind a reflected shock wave in xenon (f/24 spectrometer). Wavelength increases toward the right, time downward. Total duration of the reflected shock light is about 500 μsec. (a) λ=4350–4950 A. The lines superimposed on the continuum belong to XeI. (b) λ=4900–5500 A. The line appearing initially belongs to XeI (4916, 4925 A, unresolved). The three lines appearing later belong to CuI (5105, 5153, and 5218 A).

Tables (1)

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Table I Minimum resolvable times ultimately observable with the f/24 Bausch & Lomb (B & L) spectrometer, assuming perfect source, detector, and optics. Minimum resolvable times for other spectrometers can be calculated by dividing the various products of α·τmin from below by the α appropriate to the other spectrometer, e.g., α=5×10−5 for the f/4 spectrometer referred to in the text.