Abstract

Four fundamental.methods are described for recording the intensity of radially symmetric scattered radiation as a function of scattering angle.

The first and second arrangements utilize the conventional incident pencil of radiation. The first scheme scans a diameter of the scattering pattern in the customary fashion. The second scheme scans with axial translation of a circular ring aperture.

The third scheme uses a divergent incident beam on a ring specimen and scans axially with a pinhole detector. The fourth scheme employs a beam from a ring source converging onto the specimen and records the intensity on the axis as a function of the angle of convergence, as the specimen is translated axially.

The third arrangement is illustrated with an example which demonstrates its feasibility.

© 1953 Optical Society of America

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Figures (7)

F. 1
F. 1

Customary scheme for scanning diameter.

F. 2
F. 2

Ring aperture with detector translating axially.

F. 3
F. 3

Ring aperture at sample (diverging incidence). Point aperture with detector translating axially.

F. 4
F. 4

Illustration of detection of high intensity at scattering angle , and low intensity above and below .—for scheme of Fig. 3.

F. 5
F. 5

10.0 angstrom spacing line of sodium acetate, resolved by the arrangement of Fig. 3.

F. 6
F. 6

Ring aperture at source (converging incidence). Point aperture with sample translating axially.

F. 7
F. 7

Illustration of detection of high intensity at scattering angle , and low intensity above and below .—for scheme of Fig. 6.

Equations (6)

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tan = R / L ,
tan = R / L ,
= ( R / l ) + ( R / L ) .
tan = R / l .
I ( L l ) 2 .
I c = ( L l ) 2 I .