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References

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  1. W. M. Potter, “An emergency signaling mirror incorporating high efficiency with precision aiming,” Illum. Eng. 39, 253 (1944); and W. M. Potter, “Solar searchlight,” Gen. Elec. Rev. 47, 7 (1944).

1944 (1)

W. M. Potter, “An emergency signaling mirror incorporating high efficiency with precision aiming,” Illum. Eng. 39, 253 (1944); and W. M. Potter, “Solar searchlight,” Gen. Elec. Rev. 47, 7 (1944).

Potter, W. M.

W. M. Potter, “An emergency signaling mirror incorporating high efficiency with precision aiming,” Illum. Eng. 39, 253 (1944); and W. M. Potter, “Solar searchlight,” Gen. Elec. Rev. 47, 7 (1944).

Illum. Eng. (1)

W. M. Potter, “An emergency signaling mirror incorporating high efficiency with precision aiming,” Illum. Eng. 39, 253 (1944); and W. M. Potter, “Solar searchlight,” Gen. Elec. Rev. 47, 7 (1944).

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Figures (5)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Four methods of aiming mirror flashes of sunlight: (1) improvised foresight, (2) foresight (British mirror), (3) rearsight (G.E. mirror), and (4) retroreflector.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

British 4- by 4-inch stainless-steel signaling mirror with white-painted metal key.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Rear side of aluminized, tempered-glass signaling mirror manufactured by the General Electric Company and intended for rearsight aiming (courtesy of General Electric Company).

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Retroreflector-type mirror manufactured by the Signal Service Corporation. Part of case is cut away to show directions of rays involved in signaling.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Retroreflector-type mirror made with Scotchlite washer behind round window in tempered-glass mirror by the General Electric Company. Cross section of aiming mechanism below shows directions of rays involved in signaling.