Abstract

Multistage cross connects with wave-mixing conversion have two essential characteristics. First, individual converters are simultaneously shared by a significant number of channels. Second, individual channels may be converted through one or more cascaded wave-mixing conversions. The combination of both design principles contributes to the degradation of the transmission performance in the networks, to the point where it may be legitimate to question the practicality of multistage wave-mixing networks. To discuss the matter, a cross-talk analysis is conducted for wave-mixing networks with feed-forward multistage structures, and 2×2 switching elements, such as multilog networks. It is found that the dominant form of cross talk is of the first-order intraband type and that such cross talk accumulates in switching elements and in wave-mixing converters. Such induced cross talk not only results in stringent component requirements both for switching elements and for demultiplexers integrated with wave-mixing converters. It also limits the scalability and cascadability of the nodes.

© 2003 Optical Society of America

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