Abstract

The sodium chloride content in the flesh of tuna fish is one of the factors for determining the price in the fishing industry. Titration is a standard method for the analysis of salt and this is time consuming. Near infrared spectroscopy is a potential alternative method for rapid detection without the need for wet chemical assay. Although sodium chloride is infrared inactive, this study investigated the influence of salt on the absorbance of near infrared energy and showed that the sodium chloride content can be determined using changes in the water band at 970 nm. Calibration equations were developed from frozen fish pieces and ground samples using multiple linear regression for the wavelength region of 700–1000 nm. The best result was achieved from frozen samples with a coefficient of determination for the calibration set (Rcal2) = 0.71, standard error of calibration (SEC) = 0.20%, coefficient of determination for the validation set (rval2) = 0.64, standard error of prediction (SEP) = 0.26% and bias = − 0.00%. In order to verify the significant variables used to determine infrared inactive sodium chloride, partial least squares regression was performed on frozen samples. The important variable in multiple linear regression and partial least squares regression was the absorbance band at 976 nm attributed to water molecules. The result from partial least squares calibration showed Rcal2 = 0.83, SEC = 0.20%, rval2 = 0.54, SEP = 0.25% and bias = 0.00%. The salt values predicted using the near infrared models were not significantly different from the reference values obtained by the standard titration method at the 95% confidence interval.

© 2019 The Author(s)

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