Abstract

The feasibility of rapid identification of Lactobacillus species using near-infrared spectral features coupled with chemometrics was investigated. First, bacterial colonies of 11 Lactobacillus strains covering four species (Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus brevis, and Lactobacillus fermentum) were cultured using the spread-plate technique. Near-infrared spectra data of the Lactobacillus species were collected directly from the bacterial colonies. Second, 10 wavenumbers were selected from the near-infrared spectra data using uninformative variables elimination and genetic algorithm, and calibration models based on the 10 selected wavenumbers were built using least squares support vector machine. The identification rates for the prediction set and validation set were 89.04 and 85%, respectively. Third, chemical groups of the Lactobacillus cells contributing to the identification of the Lactobacillus strains were identified using mid infrared. The results of mid infrared data analysis indicated that 9 chemical groups could be considered characteristics for categorizing the 11 Lactobacillus strains. The relationship between the 10 selected wavenumbers and identified chemical groups was identified, which supported the satisfactory performance of the least squares support vector machine calibration model. This study demonstrated that near-infrared spectral features of bacterial colonies could be used for Lactobacillus typing at the strain level.

© 2019 The Author(s)

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