Abstract

We report here on the design, fabrication, and characterization of highly integrated parallel optical transceivers designed for Tb/s-class module-to-module data transfer through polymer waveguides integrated into optical printed circuit boards (o-PCBs). The parallel optical transceiver is based on a through-silicon-via silicon carrier as the platform for integration of 24-channel vertical cavity surface-emitting laser and photodiode arrays with CMOS ICs. The Si carrier also includes optical vias (holes) for optical access to conventional surface-emitting 850 nm optoelectronic devices. The 48-channel 3-D transceiver optochips are flip-chip soldered to organic carriers to form transceiver optomodules. Fully functional optomodules with 24 transmitter +24 receiver channels were assembled and characterized with transmitters operating up to 20 Gb/s/ch and receivers up to 15 Gb/s/ch. At 15 Gb/s, the 48-channel optomodules provide a bidirectional aggregate bandwidth of 360 Gb/s. In addition, o-PCBs have been developed using a 48-channel flex waveguide assembly attached to FR4 electronic boards. Incorporation of waveguide turning mirrors and lens arrays facilitates optical coupling to/from the o-PCB. Assembly of optomodules to the o-PCB using a ball grid array process provides both electrical and optical interconnections. An initial demonstration of the full module-to-module optical link achieved > 20 bidirectional links at 10 Gb/s. At 15 Gb/s, operation at a bit error ratio of < 10<sup>-12</sup> was demonstrated for 15 channels in each direction, realizing a record o-PCB link with a 225 Gb/s bidirectional aggregate data rate.

© 2011 IEEE

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