Abstract

Biofilm formation is a defense mechanism for microorganisms to survive under both natural and stress conditions. Clinically relevant microorganisms threaten patient health through biofilm formation on medical devices and implants. It is very important to identify biofilm formation in order to suppress their pathogenic activities in early stages. With the aim for better understanding biofilm formation and possibility of detection, in this study, biofilm formation of clinically important microorganisms, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Candida albicans are monitored with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The SERS spectra were collected by mapping a dried droplet area where a volume of colloidal silver nanoparticle (AgNP) suspension is placed on microorganism culture plate. The spectral changes on the SERS spectra with increasing incubation time of the model microorganisms from 4 to 120 h are monitored. The unique spectra originating from the biofilms of three pathogenic microorganisms and the spectral changes as a result of time-dependent concentration fluctuations of biomolecular species in their biofilms including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and genetic materials allow not only identification but also discrimination of biofilms using principal component analysis.

© 2017 The Author(s)

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