Abstract

Cosmic ray spikes are especially problematic for hyperspectral imaging because of the large number of spikes often present and their negative effects upon subsequent chemometric analysis. Fortunately, while the large number of spectra acquired in a hyperspectral imaging data set increases the probability and number of cosmic spikes observed, the multitude of spectra can also aid in the effective recognition and removal of the cosmic spikes. Zhang and Ben-Amotz were perhaps the first to leverage the additional spatial dimension of hyperspectral data matrices (DM). They integrated principal component analysis (PCA) into the upper bound spectrum method (UBS), resulting in a hybrid method (UBS-DM) for hyperspectral images. Here, we expand upon their use of PCA, recognizing that principal components primarily present in only a few pixels most likely correspond to cosmic spikes. Eliminating the contribution of those principal components in those pixels improves the cosmic spike removal. Both simulated and experimental hyperspectral Raman image data sets are used to test the newly developed UBS-DM-hyperspectral (UBS-DM-HS) method which extends the UBS-DM method by leveraging characteristics of hyperspectral data sets. A comparison is provided between the performance of the UBS-DM-HS method and other methods suitable for despiking hyperspectral images, evaluating both their ability to remove cosmic ray spikes and the extent to which they introduce spectral bias.

© 2016 The Author(s)

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