Abstract

A varifocal mirror is used to vibrate a virtual image of a subject through the object plane of a large aperture, low f-number lens. With such a lens, essentially one depth plane at a time will be focused on a back projection screen at the image plane. The sequence of two-dimensional planes displayed on the screen is transmitted by closed-circuit TV to a monitor. A virtual image of the monitor is formed by a second varifocal mirror vibrating 180° out of phase with the first. It correctly positions the two-dimensional planes along the depth axis and reconstructs a three-dimensional autostereoscopic image of the original subject.

© 1970 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. J. C. Muirhead, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 32, 210 (1961).
    [CrossRef]
  2. A. C. Traub, Appl. Opt. 6, 1085 (1967).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. A. C. Traub, A New Three-Dimensional Display Technique (Mitre Corp., 1968), photocopies available from CFSTI, as AD-684 252.
  4. E. G. Rawson, Appl. Opt. 7, 1505 (1968).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. The use of a large aperture, low f-number lens for photographing single depth planes of three-dimensional objects was first demonstrated by Louis Lumiere, “Photo-Stereo-Synthesis: The Photographic Representation of a Solid Object” [Brit. J. Phot. 68, 110 (25February1921)]. Lumiere viewed the final photographs by stacking one on top of the other and viewing the entire stack at once to give a three-dimensional effect.

1968 (1)

1967 (1)

1961 (1)

J. C. Muirhead, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 32, 210 (1961).
[CrossRef]

1921 (1)

The use of a large aperture, low f-number lens for photographing single depth planes of three-dimensional objects was first demonstrated by Louis Lumiere, “Photo-Stereo-Synthesis: The Photographic Representation of a Solid Object” [Brit. J. Phot. 68, 110 (25February1921)]. Lumiere viewed the final photographs by stacking one on top of the other and viewing the entire stack at once to give a three-dimensional effect.

Lumiere, Louis

The use of a large aperture, low f-number lens for photographing single depth planes of three-dimensional objects was first demonstrated by Louis Lumiere, “Photo-Stereo-Synthesis: The Photographic Representation of a Solid Object” [Brit. J. Phot. 68, 110 (25February1921)]. Lumiere viewed the final photographs by stacking one on top of the other and viewing the entire stack at once to give a three-dimensional effect.

Muirhead, J. C.

J. C. Muirhead, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 32, 210 (1961).
[CrossRef]

Rawson, E. G.

Traub, A. C.

A. C. Traub, Appl. Opt. 6, 1085 (1967).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

A. C. Traub, A New Three-Dimensional Display Technique (Mitre Corp., 1968), photocopies available from CFSTI, as AD-684 252.

Appl. Opt. (2)

Brit. J. Phot. (1)

The use of a large aperture, low f-number lens for photographing single depth planes of three-dimensional objects was first demonstrated by Louis Lumiere, “Photo-Stereo-Synthesis: The Photographic Representation of a Solid Object” [Brit. J. Phot. 68, 110 (25February1921)]. Lumiere viewed the final photographs by stacking one on top of the other and viewing the entire stack at once to give a three-dimensional effect.

Rev. Sci. Instrum. (1)

J. C. Muirhead, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 32, 210 (1961).
[CrossRef]

Other (1)

A. C. Traub, A New Three-Dimensional Display Technique (Mitre Corp., 1968), photocopies available from CFSTI, as AD-684 252.

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Figures (5)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Experimental schematic.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Definition of terms.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Method for doubling the vertical scan rate.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Stereopair showing reconstructed image directly from back projection screen.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Stereopair showing close-up of reconstructed image.

Equations (22)

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1 / S + 1 / S = 2 / r ,
σ = σ / ( 1 + 4 σ δ ) ,
m = 1 / ( 1 + 4 σ δ ) ,
σ = S F R σ , S R , δ = Δ R , m = S / S .
m = m 1 m 2 1.
m 1 = 1 / ( 1 + 4 σ 1 δ 1 ) ,
m 2 = 1 / ( 1 + 4 σ 2 δ 2 ) .
σ 1 = σ 1 / ( 1 + 4 σ 1 δ 1 ) .
m 1 = 1 + 4 σ 1 δ 1 .
A = δ 2 / δ 1 .
m 2 = 1 / ( 1 + 4 σ 2 A δ 1 ) .
m = m 1 m 2 = 1 + 4 σ 1 δ 1 1 + 4 A σ 2 δ 1 1 ,
σ 1 = A σ 2 .
σ 1 = σ 1 / ( 1 + 4 σ 1 δ 1 ) .
σ 2 = σ 2 / ( 1 + 4 σ 2 A δ 1 ) .
σ 1 = A σ 2 ,
M L = d S 2 / d S 1 .
M L = d S 2 / d S 1 d S F , 2 / d S F , 1 = d σ 2 / d σ 1 .
M L = 1 / A .
M T = M × m ,
M T = M L .
M = 1 / A .

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